Bilateral leg movements during sleep: detailing their structure and features in normal controls and in patients with restless legs syndrome

Raffaele Ferri, Mauro Manconi, Francesco Rundo, Debora Aricò, Oliviero Bruni, Filomena I I Cosentino, Stephany Fulda

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Abstract

Objective The aim of this study was to analyze statistically the number of single leg movements (LMs) forming bilateral LMs during sleep, along with their combined duration, to eventually provide evidence-based data for the adjustment of the current scoring rules defining bilateral LMs. Methods Polysomnographic recordings of 111 untreated patients with RLS with a median age of 56.0 years, along with 42 normal controls with a mean age of 60.0 years, were included. In each recording, we identified all LMs that were considered as bilateral when two or more LMs were overlapping or the onset of the following movement was <0.5 second after the offset of the preceding LM. The remaining LMs were classified as monolateral. A series of parameters were computed for both bilateral and monolateral LMs. Results The duration of monolateral LMs in RLS patients was significantly longer than that of normal controls. For bilateral LMs, the maximum number of single LMs forming a bilateral movement and the maximum duration were slightly higher in RLS patients; however, the distribution of the number of individual LMs forming a single bilateral LM was similar. Only 0.12% and 0.27% of bilateral LMs consisted of >4 individual movements, and only 0.16% and 1.90% of bilateral LMs were >15 seconds in RLS patients and healthy controls, respectively. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that bilateral LMs during sleep should be constituted by no more than four individual LMs and should have a maximum duration of 15 seconds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-15
Number of pages6
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jun 7 2016

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Restless Legs Syndrome
Leg
Sleep
Research Design

Keywords

  • Bilateral leg movements
  • Periodic leg movements during sleep
  • PLMS
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Sleep scoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Bilateral leg movements during sleep: detailing their structure and features in normal controls and in patients with restless legs syndrome",
abstract = "Objective The aim of this study was to analyze statistically the number of single leg movements (LMs) forming bilateral LMs during sleep, along with their combined duration, to eventually provide evidence-based data for the adjustment of the current scoring rules defining bilateral LMs. Methods Polysomnographic recordings of 111 untreated patients with RLS with a median age of 56.0 years, along with 42 normal controls with a mean age of 60.0 years, were included. In each recording, we identified all LMs that were considered as bilateral when two or more LMs were overlapping or the onset of the following movement was <0.5 second after the offset of the preceding LM. The remaining LMs were classified as monolateral. A series of parameters were computed for both bilateral and monolateral LMs. Results The duration of monolateral LMs in RLS patients was significantly longer than that of normal controls. For bilateral LMs, the maximum number of single LMs forming a bilateral movement and the maximum duration were slightly higher in RLS patients; however, the distribution of the number of individual LMs forming a single bilateral LM was similar. Only 0.12{\%} and 0.27{\%} of bilateral LMs consisted of >4 individual movements, and only 0.16{\%} and 1.90{\%} of bilateral LMs were >15 seconds in RLS patients and healthy controls, respectively. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that bilateral LMs during sleep should be constituted by no more than four individual LMs and should have a maximum duration of 15 seconds.",
keywords = "Bilateral leg movements, Periodic leg movements during sleep, PLMS, Restless legs syndrome, Sleep scoring",
author = "Raffaele Ferri and Mauro Manconi and Francesco Rundo and Debora Aric{\`o} and Oliviero Bruni and Cosentino, {Filomena I I} and Stephany Fulda",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.sleep.2016.03.018",
language = "English",
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journal = "Sleep Medicine",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Bilateral leg movements during sleep

T2 - detailing their structure and features in normal controls and in patients with restless legs syndrome

AU - Ferri, Raffaele

AU - Manconi, Mauro

AU - Rundo, Francesco

AU - Aricò, Debora

AU - Bruni, Oliviero

AU - Cosentino, Filomena I I

AU - Fulda, Stephany

PY - 2016/6/7

Y1 - 2016/6/7

N2 - Objective The aim of this study was to analyze statistically the number of single leg movements (LMs) forming bilateral LMs during sleep, along with their combined duration, to eventually provide evidence-based data for the adjustment of the current scoring rules defining bilateral LMs. Methods Polysomnographic recordings of 111 untreated patients with RLS with a median age of 56.0 years, along with 42 normal controls with a mean age of 60.0 years, were included. In each recording, we identified all LMs that were considered as bilateral when two or more LMs were overlapping or the onset of the following movement was <0.5 second after the offset of the preceding LM. The remaining LMs were classified as monolateral. A series of parameters were computed for both bilateral and monolateral LMs. Results The duration of monolateral LMs in RLS patients was significantly longer than that of normal controls. For bilateral LMs, the maximum number of single LMs forming a bilateral movement and the maximum duration were slightly higher in RLS patients; however, the distribution of the number of individual LMs forming a single bilateral LM was similar. Only 0.12% and 0.27% of bilateral LMs consisted of >4 individual movements, and only 0.16% and 1.90% of bilateral LMs were >15 seconds in RLS patients and healthy controls, respectively. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that bilateral LMs during sleep should be constituted by no more than four individual LMs and should have a maximum duration of 15 seconds.

AB - Objective The aim of this study was to analyze statistically the number of single leg movements (LMs) forming bilateral LMs during sleep, along with their combined duration, to eventually provide evidence-based data for the adjustment of the current scoring rules defining bilateral LMs. Methods Polysomnographic recordings of 111 untreated patients with RLS with a median age of 56.0 years, along with 42 normal controls with a mean age of 60.0 years, were included. In each recording, we identified all LMs that were considered as bilateral when two or more LMs were overlapping or the onset of the following movement was <0.5 second after the offset of the preceding LM. The remaining LMs were classified as monolateral. A series of parameters were computed for both bilateral and monolateral LMs. Results The duration of monolateral LMs in RLS patients was significantly longer than that of normal controls. For bilateral LMs, the maximum number of single LMs forming a bilateral movement and the maximum duration were slightly higher in RLS patients; however, the distribution of the number of individual LMs forming a single bilateral LM was similar. Only 0.12% and 0.27% of bilateral LMs consisted of >4 individual movements, and only 0.16% and 1.90% of bilateral LMs were >15 seconds in RLS patients and healthy controls, respectively. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that bilateral LMs during sleep should be constituted by no more than four individual LMs and should have a maximum duration of 15 seconds.

KW - Bilateral leg movements

KW - Periodic leg movements during sleep

KW - PLMS

KW - Restless legs syndrome

KW - Sleep scoring

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