Biofilm formation in Staphylococcus implant infections. A review of molecular mechanisms and implications for biofilm-resistant materials

Carla Renata Arciola, Davide Campoccia, Pietro Speziale, Lucio Montanaro, John William Costerton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Implant infections in orthopaedics, as well as in many other medical fields, are chiefly caused by staphylococci. The ability of growing within a biofilm enhances the chances of staphylococci to protect themselves from host defences, antibiotic therapies, and biocides. Advances in scientific knowledge on structural molecules (exopolysaccharide, proteins, teichoic acids, and the most recently described extracellular DNA), on the synthesis and genetics of staphylococcal biofilms, and on the complex network of signal factors that intervene in their control are here presented, also reporting on the emerging strategies to disrupt or inhibit them. The attitude of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages to infiltrate and phagocytise biofilms, as well as the ambiguous behaviour exhibited by these innate immune cells in biofilm-related implant infections, are here discussed. Research on anti-biofilm biomaterials is focused, reviewing materials loaded with antibacterial substances, or coated with anti-adhesive/anti-bacterial immobilized agents, or surfaced with nanostructures. Latter approaches appear promising, since they avoid the spread of antibacterial substances in the neighbouring tissues with the consequent risk of inducing bacterial resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5967-5982
Number of pages16
JournalBiomaterials
Volume33
Issue number26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Antibacterial biomaterials
  • Biofilm
  • Immune response
  • Implant infections
  • Osteolysis
  • Staphylococcus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Biophysics

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