Biological and genetic evolution of HIV type 1 in two siblings with different patterns of disease progression

Chiara Ripamonti, Thomas Leitner, Anna Laurén, Ingrid Karlsson, Angela Pastore, Mariangela Cavarelli, Liselotte Antonsson, Anna Plebani, Eva Maria Fenyö, Gabriella Scarlatti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the immunological and virological factors that may lead to different patterns of disease progression characteristic of HIV-1-infected children, two HIV-1-infected siblings, a slow and a fast progressor, were followed prospectively before the onset of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Viral coreceptor usage, including the use of CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors, macrophage tropism, and sensitivity to the CC-chemokine RANTES, has been studied. An autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibody response has been documented using peripheral blood mononuclear cells- and GHOST(3) cell line-based assays. Viral evolution was investigated by env C2-V3 region sequence analysis. Although both siblings were infected with HIV-1 of the R5 phenotype, their viruses showed important biological differences. In the fast progressor there was a higher RANTES sensitivity of the early virus, an increased trend to change the mode of CCR5 receptor use, and a larger genetic evolution. Both children developed an autologous neutralizing antibody response starting from the second year with evidence of the continuous emergence of resistant variants. A marked viral genetic and phenotypic evolution was documented in the fast progressor sibling, which is accompanied by a high viral RANTES sensitivity and persistent neutralizing antibodies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1531-1540
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2007

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Biological Evolution
Chemokine CCL5
Molecular Evolution
Neutralizing Antibodies
Disease Progression
HIV-1
Siblings
Antibody Formation
CCR5 Receptors
CXCR4 Receptors
Heterophile Antibodies
Viruses
CC Chemokines
Tropism
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Immunologic Factors
Sequence Analysis
Blood Cells
Macrophages
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Biological and genetic evolution of HIV type 1 in two siblings with different patterns of disease progression. / Ripamonti, Chiara; Leitner, Thomas; Laurén, Anna; Karlsson, Ingrid; Pastore, Angela; Cavarelli, Mariangela; Antonsson, Liselotte; Plebani, Anna; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Scarlatti, Gabriella.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 23, No. 12, 01.12.2007, p. 1531-1540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ripamonti, C, Leitner, T, Laurén, A, Karlsson, I, Pastore, A, Cavarelli, M, Antonsson, L, Plebani, A, Fenyö, EM & Scarlatti, G 2007, 'Biological and genetic evolution of HIV type 1 in two siblings with different patterns of disease progression', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 23, no. 12, pp. 1531-1540. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2006.0215
Ripamonti, Chiara ; Leitner, Thomas ; Laurén, Anna ; Karlsson, Ingrid ; Pastore, Angela ; Cavarelli, Mariangela ; Antonsson, Liselotte ; Plebani, Anna ; Fenyö, Eva Maria ; Scarlatti, Gabriella. / Biological and genetic evolution of HIV type 1 in two siblings with different patterns of disease progression. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2007 ; Vol. 23, No. 12. pp. 1531-1540.
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