Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) in operating room personnel

Marcello Imbriani, Sergio Ghittori, Giulio Pezzagno, Emanuele Capodaglio, Marcello Imbriani, Sergio Ghittori, Giulio Pezzagno, Emanuele Capodaglio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) can be achieved by measuring concentrations of inorganic fluorides in the blood and urine and of enflurane in alveolar air and venous blood. Measurement of these concentrations, however, has limitations. Another method for monitoring exposure to enflurane is to measure its concentration in urine throughout the period of exposure. In this study, we measured the environmental and urinary concentrations of enflurane. Enflurane in the ambient atmosphere was determined in 18 operating theaters of eight hospitals in Italy. Ambient air concentrations exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-recommended time-weighted average exposure level of 1 ppm (median: 1.31 ppm). Enflurane was detected in urine of 159 exposed subjects (anesthetists, surgeons, and nurses). A significant correlation was found between enflurane concentration in urine produced during the shift and environmental concentration (r = 0.77, p =.0001). The results showed that urinary enflurane concentration can be used as an appropriate biological exposure index. The biological values proposed are 153 μg/l, corresponding to 75 ppm of environmental exposure; 22 μg/l, corresponding to 10 ppm of environmental exposure; and 3.5 μg/l, corresponding to 1 ppm of environmental exposure. The proposed values can be regarded as time-weighted average samples, reflecting exposure for a 4-h period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-140
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Environmental Health
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Operating rooms
Enflurane
Environmental Monitoring
occupational exposure
Operating Rooms
Occupational Exposure
Personnel
Monitoring
urine
Environmental Exposure
Urine
blood
Blood
Air
Nurse Anesthetists
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.)
exposure
biological monitoring
Theaters
fluoride

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) in operating room personnel. / Imbriani, Marcello; Ghittori, Sergio; Pezzagno, Giulio; Capodaglio, Emanuele; Imbriani, Marcello; Ghittori, Sergio; Pezzagno, Giulio; Capodaglio, Emanuele.

In: Archives of Environmental Health, Vol. 49, No. 2, 1994, p. 135-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Imbriani, M, Ghittori, S, Pezzagno, G, Capodaglio, E, Imbriani, M, Ghittori, S, Pezzagno, G & Capodaglio, E 1994, 'Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) in operating room personnel', Archives of Environmental Health, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 135-140. https://doi.org/10.1080/00039896.1994.9937467
Imbriani, Marcello ; Ghittori, Sergio ; Pezzagno, Giulio ; Capodaglio, Emanuele ; Imbriani, Marcello ; Ghittori, Sergio ; Pezzagno, Giulio ; Capodaglio, Emanuele. / Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) in operating room personnel. In: Archives of Environmental Health. 1994 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 135-140.
@article{a915071cb53e4b36a8ec4bc72494243a,
title = "Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) in operating room personnel",
abstract = "Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) can be achieved by measuring concentrations of inorganic fluorides in the blood and urine and of enflurane in alveolar air and venous blood. Measurement of these concentrations, however, has limitations. Another method for monitoring exposure to enflurane is to measure its concentration in urine throughout the period of exposure. In this study, we measured the environmental and urinary concentrations of enflurane. Enflurane in the ambient atmosphere was determined in 18 operating theaters of eight hospitals in Italy. Ambient air concentrations exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-recommended time-weighted average exposure level of 1 ppm (median: 1.31 ppm). Enflurane was detected in urine of 159 exposed subjects (anesthetists, surgeons, and nurses). A significant correlation was found between enflurane concentration in urine produced during the shift and environmental concentration (r = 0.77, p =.0001). The results showed that urinary enflurane concentration can be used as an appropriate biological exposure index. The biological values proposed are 153 μg/l, corresponding to 75 ppm of environmental exposure; 22 μg/l, corresponding to 10 ppm of environmental exposure; and 3.5 μg/l, corresponding to 1 ppm of environmental exposure. The proposed values can be regarded as time-weighted average samples, reflecting exposure for a 4-h period.",
author = "Marcello Imbriani and Sergio Ghittori and Giulio Pezzagno and Emanuele Capodaglio and Marcello Imbriani and Sergio Ghittori and Giulio Pezzagno and Emanuele Capodaglio",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1080/00039896.1994.9937467",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "135--140",
journal = "Archives of Environmental Health",
issn = "0003-9896",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) in operating room personnel

AU - Imbriani, Marcello

AU - Ghittori, Sergio

AU - Pezzagno, Giulio

AU - Capodaglio, Emanuele

AU - Imbriani, Marcello

AU - Ghittori, Sergio

AU - Pezzagno, Giulio

AU - Capodaglio, Emanuele

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) can be achieved by measuring concentrations of inorganic fluorides in the blood and urine and of enflurane in alveolar air and venous blood. Measurement of these concentrations, however, has limitations. Another method for monitoring exposure to enflurane is to measure its concentration in urine throughout the period of exposure. In this study, we measured the environmental and urinary concentrations of enflurane. Enflurane in the ambient atmosphere was determined in 18 operating theaters of eight hospitals in Italy. Ambient air concentrations exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-recommended time-weighted average exposure level of 1 ppm (median: 1.31 ppm). Enflurane was detected in urine of 159 exposed subjects (anesthetists, surgeons, and nurses). A significant correlation was found between enflurane concentration in urine produced during the shift and environmental concentration (r = 0.77, p =.0001). The results showed that urinary enflurane concentration can be used as an appropriate biological exposure index. The biological values proposed are 153 μg/l, corresponding to 75 ppm of environmental exposure; 22 μg/l, corresponding to 10 ppm of environmental exposure; and 3.5 μg/l, corresponding to 1 ppm of environmental exposure. The proposed values can be regarded as time-weighted average samples, reflecting exposure for a 4-h period.

AB - Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to enflurane (ethrane) can be achieved by measuring concentrations of inorganic fluorides in the blood and urine and of enflurane in alveolar air and venous blood. Measurement of these concentrations, however, has limitations. Another method for monitoring exposure to enflurane is to measure its concentration in urine throughout the period of exposure. In this study, we measured the environmental and urinary concentrations of enflurane. Enflurane in the ambient atmosphere was determined in 18 operating theaters of eight hospitals in Italy. Ambient air concentrations exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-recommended time-weighted average exposure level of 1 ppm (median: 1.31 ppm). Enflurane was detected in urine of 159 exposed subjects (anesthetists, surgeons, and nurses). A significant correlation was found between enflurane concentration in urine produced during the shift and environmental concentration (r = 0.77, p =.0001). The results showed that urinary enflurane concentration can be used as an appropriate biological exposure index. The biological values proposed are 153 μg/l, corresponding to 75 ppm of environmental exposure; 22 μg/l, corresponding to 10 ppm of environmental exposure; and 3.5 μg/l, corresponding to 1 ppm of environmental exposure. The proposed values can be regarded as time-weighted average samples, reflecting exposure for a 4-h period.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028354083&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028354083&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00039896.1994.9937467

DO - 10.1080/00039896.1994.9937467

M3 - Article

C2 - 8161244

AN - SCOPUS:0028354083

VL - 49

SP - 135

EP - 140

JO - Archives of Environmental Health

JF - Archives of Environmental Health

SN - 0003-9896

IS - 2

ER -