Biomechanics of the conservative treatment in idiopathic scoliotic curves in surgical "grey-Area"

L. Aulisa, S. Lupparelli, E. Pola, A. G. Aulisa, G. Mastantuoni, L. Pitta

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The biomechanical behaviour of the spine significantly varies in relation to the age of the spine. Particularly, the elastic behaviour of the intervertebral discs has been proved to change during the spine growth, which changes the disc reaction to externally imparted forces. The biomechanical analysis of the G modulus of torsion rigidity of the intervertebral disc shows that the G values progressively increase through growth, which favours the progression of early scoliotic curves. At the same time, however, early structural scoliosis is more amenable to conservative treatment owing to the residual growth potential of the spine. Whereas indications to surgical treatment of scoliotic curves has been based upon the magnitude of the curves as measured according to the Cobb method, two additional factors affect the chance of correcting a scoliotic curve, The first is the residual growth potential of the vertebrae. In fact, a longer residual growth allows for external forces to be applied so as to change the growth model of the scoliotic spine, which ensures a stable correction of the deformity when these external forces are removed. The second is the magnitude of the elastic deformation of the intervertebral discs. It has been suggested that a deformation beyond the disc elastic behaviour, by producing hysteresis of the disc, renders the disc less susceptible to transferring the load to the neighbouring vertebral bodies, thus impairing remodelling. It ensues that both the age and the magnitude of rotation affects the success of conservative treatment and not only the magnitude in Cobb degrees. The curve localization adds to these two parameters, thoracic curves being stiffer than thoraco- lumbar and lumbar curves.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Pages412-418
Number of pages7
Volume91
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Event4th Meeting of the International Research Society of Spinal Deformities, IRSSD 2002 - Athens, Greece
Duration: May 24 2002May 27 2002

Other

Other4th Meeting of the International Research Society of Spinal Deformities, IRSSD 2002
CountryGreece
CityAthens
Period5/24/025/27/02

Fingerprint

Biomechanics
Biomechanical Phenomena
Spine
Intervertebral Disc
Growth
Elastic deformation
Scoliosis
Rigidity
Torsional stress
Hysteresis
Conservative Treatment
Thorax

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Aulisa, L., Lupparelli, S., Pola, E., Aulisa, A. G., Mastantuoni, G., & Pitta, L. (2002). Biomechanics of the conservative treatment in idiopathic scoliotic curves in surgical "grey-Area". In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics (Vol. 91, pp. 412-418) https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-935-6-412

Biomechanics of the conservative treatment in idiopathic scoliotic curves in surgical "grey-Area". / Aulisa, L.; Lupparelli, S.; Pola, E.; Aulisa, A. G.; Mastantuoni, G.; Pitta, L.

Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 91 2002. p. 412-418.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Aulisa, L, Lupparelli, S, Pola, E, Aulisa, AG, Mastantuoni, G & Pitta, L 2002, Biomechanics of the conservative treatment in idiopathic scoliotic curves in surgical "grey-Area". in Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. vol. 91, pp. 412-418, 4th Meeting of the International Research Society of Spinal Deformities, IRSSD 2002, Athens, Greece, 5/24/02. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-935-6-412
Aulisa L, Lupparelli S, Pola E, Aulisa AG, Mastantuoni G, Pitta L. Biomechanics of the conservative treatment in idiopathic scoliotic curves in surgical "grey-Area". In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 91. 2002. p. 412-418 https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-935-6-412
Aulisa, L. ; Lupparelli, S. ; Pola, E. ; Aulisa, A. G. ; Mastantuoni, G. ; Pitta, L. / Biomechanics of the conservative treatment in idiopathic scoliotic curves in surgical "grey-Area". Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 91 2002. pp. 412-418
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