Birth-weight as a risk factor for cancer in adulthood: The stem cell perspective

C. Capittini, P. Bergamaschi, A. De Silvestri, A. Marchesi, V. Genovese, B. Romano, C. Tinelli, L. Salvaneschi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 'stem cell burden' hypothesis represents a plausible explanation for the association between birth-weight and the risk of breast cancer in adulthood. The size of the overall stem cell pool would be expected to affect organ size and consequently birth-weight, making birth-weight a proxy for the overall number of fetal stem cells. As stem cells are self-renewing, the greater their number is at birth, the higher will be the chance that one of them will undergo carcinogenesis over the years. To investigate the correlation between birth-weight and stem cell burden, we examined the cord blood hematopoietic CD34+ stem cell population as an indicator of the overall fetal stem cell number. We measured both the CD34+ level (by flow cytometry) and the CD34+ proliferative potential (by the GM-CFU culture), in a sample of 1037 healthy newborn cord blood donors. We found that heavier babies had a significantly greater CD34+ stem cell concentration (p <0.001) and a higher GM-CFU number than lighter babies (p <0.001). Thus, a high birth-weight was positively associated with a high concentration of CD34+ stem cells and also with a qualitatively higher "stemness" of this pool. Therefore, our data support the theory that birth-weight reflects the number of fetal stem cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-93
Number of pages3
JournalMaturitas
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Stem cells
Birth Weight
Stem Cells
Fetal Stem Cells
Neoplasms
Granulocyte-Macrophage Progenitor Cells
Fetal Blood
Organ Size
Proxy
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Blood Donors
Blood
Flow Cytometry
Carcinogenesis
Cell Count
Parturition
Newborn Infant
Flow cytometry
Breast Neoplasms
Population

Keywords

  • Birth weight
  • Cancer risk
  • Proliferative potential
  • Stem cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Birth-weight as a risk factor for cancer in adulthood : The stem cell perspective. / Capittini, C.; Bergamaschi, P.; De Silvestri, A.; Marchesi, A.; Genovese, V.; Romano, B.; Tinelli, C.; Salvaneschi, L.

In: Maturitas, Vol. 69, No. 1, 05.2011, p. 91-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a741211d7d1f48e9bf9e87e049cf17ee,
title = "Birth-weight as a risk factor for cancer in adulthood: The stem cell perspective",
abstract = "The 'stem cell burden' hypothesis represents a plausible explanation for the association between birth-weight and the risk of breast cancer in adulthood. The size of the overall stem cell pool would be expected to affect organ size and consequently birth-weight, making birth-weight a proxy for the overall number of fetal stem cells. As stem cells are self-renewing, the greater their number is at birth, the higher will be the chance that one of them will undergo carcinogenesis over the years. To investigate the correlation between birth-weight and stem cell burden, we examined the cord blood hematopoietic CD34+ stem cell population as an indicator of the overall fetal stem cell number. We measured both the CD34+ level (by flow cytometry) and the CD34+ proliferative potential (by the GM-CFU culture), in a sample of 1037 healthy newborn cord blood donors. We found that heavier babies had a significantly greater CD34+ stem cell concentration (p <0.001) and a higher GM-CFU number than lighter babies (p <0.001). Thus, a high birth-weight was positively associated with a high concentration of CD34+ stem cells and also with a qualitatively higher {"}stemness{"} of this pool. Therefore, our data support the theory that birth-weight reflects the number of fetal stem cells.",
keywords = "Birth weight, Cancer risk, Proliferative potential, Stem cell",
author = "C. Capittini and P. Bergamaschi and {De Silvestri}, A. and A. Marchesi and V. Genovese and B. Romano and C. Tinelli and L. Salvaneschi",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.02.013",
language = "English",
volume = "69",
pages = "91--93",
journal = "Maturitas",
issn = "0378-5122",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Birth-weight as a risk factor for cancer in adulthood

T2 - The stem cell perspective

AU - Capittini, C.

AU - Bergamaschi, P.

AU - De Silvestri, A.

AU - Marchesi, A.

AU - Genovese, V.

AU - Romano, B.

AU - Tinelli, C.

AU - Salvaneschi, L.

PY - 2011/5

Y1 - 2011/5

N2 - The 'stem cell burden' hypothesis represents a plausible explanation for the association between birth-weight and the risk of breast cancer in adulthood. The size of the overall stem cell pool would be expected to affect organ size and consequently birth-weight, making birth-weight a proxy for the overall number of fetal stem cells. As stem cells are self-renewing, the greater their number is at birth, the higher will be the chance that one of them will undergo carcinogenesis over the years. To investigate the correlation between birth-weight and stem cell burden, we examined the cord blood hematopoietic CD34+ stem cell population as an indicator of the overall fetal stem cell number. We measured both the CD34+ level (by flow cytometry) and the CD34+ proliferative potential (by the GM-CFU culture), in a sample of 1037 healthy newborn cord blood donors. We found that heavier babies had a significantly greater CD34+ stem cell concentration (p <0.001) and a higher GM-CFU number than lighter babies (p <0.001). Thus, a high birth-weight was positively associated with a high concentration of CD34+ stem cells and also with a qualitatively higher "stemness" of this pool. Therefore, our data support the theory that birth-weight reflects the number of fetal stem cells.

AB - The 'stem cell burden' hypothesis represents a plausible explanation for the association between birth-weight and the risk of breast cancer in adulthood. The size of the overall stem cell pool would be expected to affect organ size and consequently birth-weight, making birth-weight a proxy for the overall number of fetal stem cells. As stem cells are self-renewing, the greater their number is at birth, the higher will be the chance that one of them will undergo carcinogenesis over the years. To investigate the correlation between birth-weight and stem cell burden, we examined the cord blood hematopoietic CD34+ stem cell population as an indicator of the overall fetal stem cell number. We measured both the CD34+ level (by flow cytometry) and the CD34+ proliferative potential (by the GM-CFU culture), in a sample of 1037 healthy newborn cord blood donors. We found that heavier babies had a significantly greater CD34+ stem cell concentration (p <0.001) and a higher GM-CFU number than lighter babies (p <0.001). Thus, a high birth-weight was positively associated with a high concentration of CD34+ stem cells and also with a qualitatively higher "stemness" of this pool. Therefore, our data support the theory that birth-weight reflects the number of fetal stem cells.

KW - Birth weight

KW - Cancer risk

KW - Proliferative potential

KW - Stem cell

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79954628435&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79954628435&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.02.013

DO - 10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.02.013

M3 - Article

C2 - 21429677

AN - SCOPUS:79954628435

VL - 69

SP - 91

EP - 93

JO - Maturitas

JF - Maturitas

SN - 0378-5122

IS - 1

ER -