Birth weight influences long-term catch-up growth and height prognosis of GH-deficient children treated before the age of 2 years

Malgorzata Wasniewska, Teresa Arrigo, Mariangela Cisternino, Francesco De Luca, Lucia Ghizzoni, Mohamad Maghnie, Mariella Valenzise, Filippo De Luca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate which pretreatment variables most significantly affect long-term growth response to GH therapy in children with apparently idiopathic GH deficiency (GHD) treated from a similar and very young age (less than 2 years), for the same period (7 years) and with the same therapeutic protocol. Design and methods: Twelve children with either isolated GHD or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency were treated with biosynthetic human GH (0.7 IU/kg per week) and were examined every 6 months. Height measurements were performed by Harpenden stadiometers. Bone age was evaluated every 12 months. Results: The onset of therapy was followed in all patients by an important height gain, which attained its zenith during the first year of treatment and became progressively less evident during the next 4 years. Cumulative height gain was 3.0 ± 1.7 SDS. Thanks to the therapy, at the end of the 7-year treatment period, average height in the entire series was not significantly far from mean target height (TH) (-0.7 ± 1.3 vs -0.3 ± 0.4 SDS) and average predicted height (PH) (-0.2 ± 1.4 SDS) was very close to TH. A stepwise regression analysis showed that both catch-up growth under therapy and PH at the end of the 7-year treatment period were positively influenced by birth weight (BW). Conclusions: a) Our 7-year prospective study on GHD infants treated with GH from less than 2 years of age confirmed the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of GHD in childhood. b) The influence of BW on growth response to GH therapy in GHD children persists over time, at least when treatment is begun from less than 2 years of age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)460-465
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Endocrinology
Volume142
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 2000

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Birth Weight
Growth
Therapeutics
Pituitary Dwarfism
Pituitary Hormones
Early Diagnosis
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Birth weight influences long-term catch-up growth and height prognosis of GH-deficient children treated before the age of 2 years. / Wasniewska, Malgorzata; Arrigo, Teresa; Cisternino, Mariangela; De Luca, Francesco; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Maghnie, Mohamad; Valenzise, Mariella; De Luca, Filippo.

In: European Journal of Endocrinology, Vol. 142, No. 5, 05.2000, p. 460-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wasniewska, M, Arrigo, T, Cisternino, M, De Luca, F, Ghizzoni, L, Maghnie, M, Valenzise, M & De Luca, F 2000, 'Birth weight influences long-term catch-up growth and height prognosis of GH-deficient children treated before the age of 2 years', European Journal of Endocrinology, vol. 142, no. 5, pp. 460-465.
Wasniewska, Malgorzata ; Arrigo, Teresa ; Cisternino, Mariangela ; De Luca, Francesco ; Ghizzoni, Lucia ; Maghnie, Mohamad ; Valenzise, Mariella ; De Luca, Filippo. / Birth weight influences long-term catch-up growth and height prognosis of GH-deficient children treated before the age of 2 years. In: European Journal of Endocrinology. 2000 ; Vol. 142, No. 5. pp. 460-465.
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AU - De Luca, Francesco

AU - Ghizzoni, Lucia

AU - Maghnie, Mohamad

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AU - De Luca, Filippo

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