Effetti epigenetici come mediatori dell'azione pro-coagulante delle polveri sottili ad alto contenuto metallico. Uno studio di epidemiologia occupazionale

Translated title of the contribution: Blood hypo-methylation mediates the effects of metal-rich airborne particles on blood coagulation: An occupational epidemiological study

M. Bonzini, L. Tarantini, L. Angelici, A. Baccarelli, P. Apostoli, P. A. Bertazzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Particulate matter (PM) exposure is associated with increased coagulation and thrombosis, but the biological mechanism has not yet been clarified. DNA methylation represents a potential mechanism because it can be modified by environmental factors. Foundry workers are exposed to PM components and showed increased cardiovascular risk. In a group of 63 steel workers we found that PM and zinc airborne levels were negatively associated with leukocyte DNA methylation in genes NOS3 and ET-1 (b=-1.1; p=0.002 and b=-1.5; p=0.003, for zinc exposure respectively in multivariate regression models; b=-0.9 with p=0.01 for PMI0 exposure and NOS3) and in turn, DNA hypo-methylation resulted associated with increased Endogenous Thrombin Potential (for NOS3 b=-45.0, p=0.00I; and for ET-1 b=-16.4, p=0.03). Our study based on healthy subject exposed in occupational setting, suggests that gene specific hypomethylation contributes to environmentally-induced hypercoagulability.

Translated title of the contributionBlood hypo-methylation mediates the effects of metal-rich airborne particles on blood coagulation: An occupational epidemiological study
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)648-650
Number of pages3
JournalGiornale Italiano di Medicina del Lavoro ed Ergonomia
Volume34
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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