Blood thiamine, zinc, selenium, lead and oxidative stress in a population of male and female alcoholics: Clinical evidence and gender differences

Rosanna Mancinelli, Eleonora Barlocci, Maria Ciprotti, Oreste Senofonte, Rosanna Maria Fidente, Rosa Draisci, Maria Luisa Attilia, Mario Vitali, Marco Fiore, Mauro Ceccanti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Long term alcohol abuse is associated with deficiencies in essential nutrients and minerals that can cause a variety of medical consequences including accumulation of toxic metals. Aim. The aim of this research is to get evidence-based data to evaluate alcohol damage and to optimize treatment. Thiamine and thiamine diphosphate (T/TDP), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), lead (Pb) and oxidative stress in terms of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) were examined in blood samples from 58 alcohol dependent patients (17 females and 41 males). Results: T/TDP concentration in alcoholics resulted significantly lower than controls (p <0.005) for both sexes. Serum Zn and Se did not signifcantly differ from reference values. Levels of blood Pb in alcoholics resulted signifcantly higher (p <0.0001) than Italian reference values and were higher in females than in males. ROMs concentration was significantly higher than healthy population only in female abusers (p = 0.005). Conclusion: Alcoholics show a significant increase in blood oxidative stress and Pb and decrease in thiamine. Impairment occurs mainly in female abusers confirming a gender specific vulnerability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-72
Number of pages8
JournalAnnali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanita
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Alcohol abuse
  • Essential nutrients
  • Gender differences
  • Oxidative strss
  • Pb accumulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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