Blood to brain iron uptake in one Rhesus monkey using [Fe-52]-citrate and positron emission tomography (PET): Influence of haloperidol

K. L. Leenders, A. Antonini, R. Schwarzbach, P. Smith-Jones, H. Reist, D. Ben-Shachar, M. Youdim, V. Henn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Iron is highly concentrated in the basal ganglia of the brain. The involvement of cerebral iron and its handling systems in neurodegenerative brain diseases like Parkinson's disease and tardive dyskinesia is currently under close investigation. There is evidence from animal studies that neuroleptics can increase iron uptake into brain. This effect appeared to be due to alteration of blood-brain barrier transport by the neuroleptics, particularly chlorpromazine and haloperidol, but not clozapine. We have investigated one Rhesus monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and [Fe-52]-citrate before and during haloperidol administration. After drug withdrawal during a period of 1.5 year the investigation procedure was repeated. The results show that in the investigated monkey haloperidol induces a reversible marked increase of iron transport across the blood brain barrier concomitant with a large increase in elimination rate of the tracer from the blood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-132
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neural Transmission, Supplement
Issue number43
Publication statusPublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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