Body mass index as a prognostic feature in operable breast cancer: The International Breast Cancer Study Group experience

Gilles Berclaz, S. Li, K. N. Price, A. S. Coates, M. Castiglione-Gertsch, C. M. Rudenstam, S. B. Holmberg, J. Lindtner, D. Eržen, J. Collins, R. Snyder, B. Thürlimann, M. F. Fey, C. Mendiola, I. Dudley Werner, E. Simoncini, D. Crivellari, R. D. Gelber, A. Goldhirsch

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Abstract

Background: Current information on the prognostic importance of body mass index (BMI) for patients with early breast cancer is based on a variety of equivocal reports. Few have data on BMI in relationship to systemic treatment. Patients and methods: Patients (6792) were randomized to International Breast Cancer Study Group trials from 1978 to 1993, studying chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. BMI was evaluated with eight other factors: menopausal status, nodal status, estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, tumor size, vessel invasion, tumor grade and treatment. BMI was categorized as normal (≤24.9), intermediate (25.0-29.9) or obese (≥30.0). Results: Patients with normal BMI had significantly longer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) than patients with intermediate or obese BMI in pairwise comparisons adjusted for other factors. Subset analyses showed the same effect in pre- and perimenopausal patients and in those receiving chemotherapy alone. When assessed globally and adjusted for other factors, BMI significantly influenced OS (P = 0.03) but not DFS (P = 0.12). Conclusions: BMI is an independent prognostic factor for OS in patients with breast cancer, especially among pre-/perimenopausal patients treated with chemotherapy without endocrine therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)875-884
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Oncology
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

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Body Mass Index
Breast Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Disease-Free Survival
Survival
Progesterone Receptors
Therapeutics
Estrogen Receptors
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Breast cancer
  • Obesity
  • Prognostic factor
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Body mass index as a prognostic feature in operable breast cancer : The International Breast Cancer Study Group experience. / Berclaz, Gilles; Li, S.; Price, K. N.; Coates, A. S.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Rudenstam, C. M.; Holmberg, S. B.; Lindtner, J.; Eržen, D.; Collins, J.; Snyder, R.; Thürlimann, B.; Fey, M. F.; Mendiola, C.; Werner, I. Dudley; Simoncini, E.; Crivellari, D.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.

In: Annals of Oncology, Vol. 15, No. 6, 06.2004, p. 875-884.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berclaz, G, Li, S, Price, KN, Coates, AS, Castiglione-Gertsch, M, Rudenstam, CM, Holmberg, SB, Lindtner, J, Eržen, D, Collins, J, Snyder, R, Thürlimann, B, Fey, MF, Mendiola, C, Werner, ID, Simoncini, E, Crivellari, D, Gelber, RD & Goldhirsch, A 2004, 'Body mass index as a prognostic feature in operable breast cancer: The International Breast Cancer Study Group experience', Annals of Oncology, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 875-884. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdh222
Berclaz, Gilles ; Li, S. ; Price, K. N. ; Coates, A. S. ; Castiglione-Gertsch, M. ; Rudenstam, C. M. ; Holmberg, S. B. ; Lindtner, J. ; Eržen, D. ; Collins, J. ; Snyder, R. ; Thürlimann, B. ; Fey, M. F. ; Mendiola, C. ; Werner, I. Dudley ; Simoncini, E. ; Crivellari, D. ; Gelber, R. D. ; Goldhirsch, A. / Body mass index as a prognostic feature in operable breast cancer : The International Breast Cancer Study Group experience. In: Annals of Oncology. 2004 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 875-884.
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abstract = "Background: Current information on the prognostic importance of body mass index (BMI) for patients with early breast cancer is based on a variety of equivocal reports. Few have data on BMI in relationship to systemic treatment. Patients and methods: Patients (6792) were randomized to International Breast Cancer Study Group trials from 1978 to 1993, studying chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. BMI was evaluated with eight other factors: menopausal status, nodal status, estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, tumor size, vessel invasion, tumor grade and treatment. BMI was categorized as normal (≤24.9), intermediate (25.0-29.9) or obese (≥30.0). Results: Patients with normal BMI had significantly longer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) than patients with intermediate or obese BMI in pairwise comparisons adjusted for other factors. Subset analyses showed the same effect in pre- and perimenopausal patients and in those receiving chemotherapy alone. When assessed globally and adjusted for other factors, BMI significantly influenced OS (P = 0.03) but not DFS (P = 0.12). Conclusions: BMI is an independent prognostic factor for OS in patients with breast cancer, especially among pre-/perimenopausal patients treated with chemotherapy without endocrine therapy.",
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AU - Li, S.

AU - Price, K. N.

AU - Coates, A. S.

AU - Castiglione-Gertsch, M.

AU - Rudenstam, C. M.

AU - Holmberg, S. B.

AU - Lindtner, J.

AU - Eržen, D.

AU - Collins, J.

AU - Snyder, R.

AU - Thürlimann, B.

AU - Fey, M. F.

AU - Mendiola, C.

AU - Werner, I. Dudley

AU - Simoncini, E.

AU - Crivellari, D.

AU - Gelber, R. D.

AU - Goldhirsch, A.

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N2 - Background: Current information on the prognostic importance of body mass index (BMI) for patients with early breast cancer is based on a variety of equivocal reports. Few have data on BMI in relationship to systemic treatment. Patients and methods: Patients (6792) were randomized to International Breast Cancer Study Group trials from 1978 to 1993, studying chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. BMI was evaluated with eight other factors: menopausal status, nodal status, estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, tumor size, vessel invasion, tumor grade and treatment. BMI was categorized as normal (≤24.9), intermediate (25.0-29.9) or obese (≥30.0). Results: Patients with normal BMI had significantly longer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) than patients with intermediate or obese BMI in pairwise comparisons adjusted for other factors. Subset analyses showed the same effect in pre- and perimenopausal patients and in those receiving chemotherapy alone. When assessed globally and adjusted for other factors, BMI significantly influenced OS (P = 0.03) but not DFS (P = 0.12). Conclusions: BMI is an independent prognostic factor for OS in patients with breast cancer, especially among pre-/perimenopausal patients treated with chemotherapy without endocrine therapy.

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