Body mass index impacts the choice of lipid-lowering treatment with no correlation to blood cholesterol - Findings from 52 916 patients in the Dyslipidemia International Study (DYSIS)

Jean Ferrières, Dominik Lautsch, Anselm K. Gitt, Gaetano De Ferrari, Hermann Toplak, Moses Elisaf, Heinz Drexel, Martin Horack, Carl Baxter, Baishali Ambegaonkar, Philippe Brudi, Peter P. Toth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A high body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We sought to identify whether BMI influences the choice of lipid-lowering treatment in a large, real-world cohort of 52916 patients treated with statins. The Dyslipidemia International Study (DYSIS) is a cross-sectional, observational, multicentre study in statin-treated patients ≥45years of age from 30 countries; 1.1% were underweight (BMI<18.5 kg/m2), 33.1% had normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), 41.5% were overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2), 17.1% had class I obesity (BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m2), 5.0% had class II obesity (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m2), and 2.1% had class III obesity (≥40kg/m2). BMI correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (Spearman's ρ: -0.147 and 0.170, respectively; P<0.0001 for both); however, there was no correlation with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; ρ: 0.003; P=0.51). Statin intensity increased with increasing BMI (ρ: 0.13; P<0.001), an association that held after adjustment for comorbidities (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 2.0-3.0) on BMI≥30kg/m2 for atorvastatin equivalent ≥40mg/d.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Cardiovascular risk
  • Cholesterol
  • Hyperlipidemia
  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Statins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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