Body mass index is strongly associated with hypertension: Results from the longevity check-up 7+ study

Francesco Landi, Riccardo Calvani, Anna Picca, Matteo Tosato, Anna Maria Martone, Elena Ortolani, Alex Sisto, Emanuela D’angelo, Elisabetta Serafini, Giovambattista Desideri, Maria Tecla Fuga, Emanuele Marzetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to provide a better insight into the relationship between different levels of body mass index (BMI) and changing risk for hypertension, using an unselected sample of participants assessed during the Longevity Check-up 7+ (Lookup 7+) project. Lookup 7+ is an ongoing cross-sectional survey started in June 2015 and conducted in unconventional settings (i.e., exhibitions, malls, and health promotion campaigns) across Italy. Candidate participants are eligible for enrolment if they are at least 18 years of age and provide written informed consent. Specific health metrics are assessed through a brief questionnaire and direct measurement of standing height, body weight, blood glucose, total blood cholesterol, and blood pressure. The present analyses were conducted in 7907 community-living adults. According to the BMI cutoffs recommended by the World Health Organization, overweight status was observed among 2896 (38%) participants; the obesity status was identified in 1135 participants (15%), with 893 (11.8%) participants in class I, 186 (2.5%) in class II, and 56 (0.7%) in class III. Among enrollees with a normal BMI, the prevalence of hypertension was 45% compared with 67% among overweight participants, 79% in obesity class I and II, and up to 87% among participants with obesity class III (p for trend < 0.001). After adjusting for age, significantly different distributions of systolic and diastolic blood pressure across BMI levels were consistent. Overall, the average systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure increased significantly and linearly across BMI levels. In conclusion, we found a gradient of increasing blood pressure with higher levels of BMI. The fact that this gradient is present even in the fully adjusted analyses suggests that BMI may cause a direct effect on blood pressure, independent of other clinical risk factors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1976
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 13 2018

Fingerprint

hypertension
body mass index
Body Mass Index
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
blood pressure
obesity
diastolic blood pressure
systolic blood pressure
Obesity
Health Promotion
health promotion
World Health Organization
cross-sectional studies
blood glucose
Informed Consent
Italy
risk factors
questionnaires
Blood Glucose

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Hypertension
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Body mass index is strongly associated with hypertension : Results from the longevity check-up 7+ study. / Landi, Francesco; Calvani, Riccardo; Picca, Anna; Tosato, Matteo; Martone, Anna Maria; Ortolani, Elena; Sisto, Alex; D’angelo, Emanuela; Serafini, Elisabetta; Desideri, Giovambattista; Fuga, Maria Tecla; Marzetti, Emanuele.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 10, No. 12, 1976, 13.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Landi, F, Calvani, R, Picca, A, Tosato, M, Martone, AM, Ortolani, E, Sisto, A, D’angelo, E, Serafini, E, Desideri, G, Fuga, MT & Marzetti, E 2018, 'Body mass index is strongly associated with hypertension: Results from the longevity check-up 7+ study', Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 12, 1976. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121976
Landi F, Calvani R, Picca A, Tosato M, Martone AM, Ortolani E et al. Body mass index is strongly associated with hypertension: Results from the longevity check-up 7+ study. Nutrients. 2018 Dec 13;10(12). 1976. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121976
Landi, Francesco ; Calvani, Riccardo ; Picca, Anna ; Tosato, Matteo ; Martone, Anna Maria ; Ortolani, Elena ; Sisto, Alex ; D’angelo, Emanuela ; Serafini, Elisabetta ; Desideri, Giovambattista ; Fuga, Maria Tecla ; Marzetti, Emanuele. / Body mass index is strongly associated with hypertension : Results from the longevity check-up 7+ study. In: Nutrients. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 12.
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