Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome

Elena Olgiati, Angelo Maravita, Viviana Spandri, Roberta Casati, Francesco Ferraro, Lucia Tedesco, Elio Clemente Agostoni, Nadia Bolognini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The alien hand syndrome (AHS) is a rare neuropsychological disorder characterized by involuntary,yet purposeful, hand movements. Patients with the AHS typically complain about a loss of agencyassociated with a feeling of estrangement for actions performed by the affected limb. The present studyexplores the integrity of the body representation in AHS, focusing on 2 main processes: multisensoryintegration and visual self-recognition of body parts. Three patients affected by AHS following a righthemispherestroke, with clinical symptoms akin to the posterior variant of AHS, were tested and theirperformance was compared with that of 18 age-matched healthy controls. Method: AHS patients and controlsunderwent 2 experimental tasks: a same-different visual matching task for body postures, which assessed theability of using your own body schema for encoding others' body postural changes (Experiment 1), and anexplicit self-hand recognition task, which assessed the ability to visually recognize your own hands (Experiment2). Results: As compared to controls, all AHS patients were unable to access a reliable multisensoryrepresentation of their alien hand and use it for decoding others' postural changes; however, they could relyon an efficient multisensory representation of their intact (ipsilesional) hand. Two AHS patients also presentedwith a specific impairment in the visual self-recognition of their alien hand, but normal recognition of theirintact hand. Conclusion: This evidence suggests that the AHS following a right-hemisphere stroke mayinvolve a disruption of the multisensory representation of the alien limb; instead, self-hand recognitionmechanisms may be spared.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)575-584
Number of pages10
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Alien Hand Syndrome
Body Image
Hand
Extremities
Recognition (Psychology)
Body Schema
Self-recognition
Syndrome
Aptitude
Vision Disorders
Posture
Human Body
Emotions

Keywords

  • Alien hand syndrome
  • Body schema
  • Multisensory
  • Self
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Olgiati, E., Maravita, A., Spandri, V., Casati, R., Ferraro, F., Tedesco, L., ... Bolognini, N. (2017). Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome. Neuropsychology, 31(5), 575-584. https://doi.org/10.1037/neu0000359

Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome. / Olgiati, Elena; Maravita, Angelo; Spandri, Viviana; Casati, Roberta; Ferraro, Francesco; Tedesco, Lucia; Agostoni, Elio Clemente; Bolognini, Nadia.

In: Neuropsychology, Vol. 31, No. 5, 01.07.2017, p. 575-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Olgiati, E, Maravita, A, Spandri, V, Casati, R, Ferraro, F, Tedesco, L, Agostoni, EC & Bolognini, N 2017, 'Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome', Neuropsychology, vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 575-584. https://doi.org/10.1037/neu0000359
Olgiati E, Maravita A, Spandri V, Casati R, Ferraro F, Tedesco L et al. Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome. Neuropsychology. 2017 Jul 1;31(5):575-584. https://doi.org/10.1037/neu0000359
Olgiati, Elena ; Maravita, Angelo ; Spandri, Viviana ; Casati, Roberta ; Ferraro, Francesco ; Tedesco, Lucia ; Agostoni, Elio Clemente ; Bolognini, Nadia. / Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome. In: Neuropsychology. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 575-584.
@article{6cfcc92e878c413594d77a992a42944b,
title = "Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome",
abstract = "Objective: The alien hand syndrome (AHS) is a rare neuropsychological disorder characterized by involuntary,yet purposeful, hand movements. Patients with the AHS typically complain about a loss of agencyassociated with a feeling of estrangement for actions performed by the affected limb. The present studyexplores the integrity of the body representation in AHS, focusing on 2 main processes: multisensoryintegration and visual self-recognition of body parts. Three patients affected by AHS following a righthemispherestroke, with clinical symptoms akin to the posterior variant of AHS, were tested and theirperformance was compared with that of 18 age-matched healthy controls. Method: AHS patients and controlsunderwent 2 experimental tasks: a same-different visual matching task for body postures, which assessed theability of using your own body schema for encoding others' body postural changes (Experiment 1), and anexplicit self-hand recognition task, which assessed the ability to visually recognize your own hands (Experiment2). Results: As compared to controls, all AHS patients were unable to access a reliable multisensoryrepresentation of their alien hand and use it for decoding others' postural changes; however, they could relyon an efficient multisensory representation of their intact (ipsilesional) hand. Two AHS patients also presentedwith a specific impairment in the visual self-recognition of their alien hand, but normal recognition of theirintact hand. Conclusion: This evidence suggests that the AHS following a right-hemisphere stroke mayinvolve a disruption of the multisensory representation of the alien limb; instead, self-hand recognitionmechanisms may be spared.",
keywords = "Alien hand syndrome, Body schema, Multisensory, Self, Stroke",
author = "Elena Olgiati and Angelo Maravita and Viviana Spandri and Roberta Casati and Francesco Ferraro and Lucia Tedesco and Agostoni, {Elio Clemente} and Nadia Bolognini",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/neu0000359",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "575--584",
journal = "Neuropsychology",
issn = "0894-4105",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome

AU - Olgiati, Elena

AU - Maravita, Angelo

AU - Spandri, Viviana

AU - Casati, Roberta

AU - Ferraro, Francesco

AU - Tedesco, Lucia

AU - Agostoni, Elio Clemente

AU - Bolognini, Nadia

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Objective: The alien hand syndrome (AHS) is a rare neuropsychological disorder characterized by involuntary,yet purposeful, hand movements. Patients with the AHS typically complain about a loss of agencyassociated with a feeling of estrangement for actions performed by the affected limb. The present studyexplores the integrity of the body representation in AHS, focusing on 2 main processes: multisensoryintegration and visual self-recognition of body parts. Three patients affected by AHS following a righthemispherestroke, with clinical symptoms akin to the posterior variant of AHS, were tested and theirperformance was compared with that of 18 age-matched healthy controls. Method: AHS patients and controlsunderwent 2 experimental tasks: a same-different visual matching task for body postures, which assessed theability of using your own body schema for encoding others' body postural changes (Experiment 1), and anexplicit self-hand recognition task, which assessed the ability to visually recognize your own hands (Experiment2). Results: As compared to controls, all AHS patients were unable to access a reliable multisensoryrepresentation of their alien hand and use it for decoding others' postural changes; however, they could relyon an efficient multisensory representation of their intact (ipsilesional) hand. Two AHS patients also presentedwith a specific impairment in the visual self-recognition of their alien hand, but normal recognition of theirintact hand. Conclusion: This evidence suggests that the AHS following a right-hemisphere stroke mayinvolve a disruption of the multisensory representation of the alien limb; instead, self-hand recognitionmechanisms may be spared.

AB - Objective: The alien hand syndrome (AHS) is a rare neuropsychological disorder characterized by involuntary,yet purposeful, hand movements. Patients with the AHS typically complain about a loss of agencyassociated with a feeling of estrangement for actions performed by the affected limb. The present studyexplores the integrity of the body representation in AHS, focusing on 2 main processes: multisensoryintegration and visual self-recognition of body parts. Three patients affected by AHS following a righthemispherestroke, with clinical symptoms akin to the posterior variant of AHS, were tested and theirperformance was compared with that of 18 age-matched healthy controls. Method: AHS patients and controlsunderwent 2 experimental tasks: a same-different visual matching task for body postures, which assessed theability of using your own body schema for encoding others' body postural changes (Experiment 1), and anexplicit self-hand recognition task, which assessed the ability to visually recognize your own hands (Experiment2). Results: As compared to controls, all AHS patients were unable to access a reliable multisensoryrepresentation of their alien hand and use it for decoding others' postural changes; however, they could relyon an efficient multisensory representation of their intact (ipsilesional) hand. Two AHS patients also presentedwith a specific impairment in the visual self-recognition of their alien hand, but normal recognition of theirintact hand. Conclusion: This evidence suggests that the AHS following a right-hemisphere stroke mayinvolve a disruption of the multisensory representation of the alien limb; instead, self-hand recognitionmechanisms may be spared.

KW - Alien hand syndrome

KW - Body schema

KW - Multisensory

KW - Self

KW - Stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85017093798&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85017093798&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/neu0000359

DO - 10.1037/neu0000359

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85017093798

VL - 31

SP - 575

EP - 584

JO - Neuropsychology

JF - Neuropsychology

SN - 0894-4105

IS - 5

ER -