Bone metabolism in men: role of aromatase activity.

R. Nuti, G. Martini, D. Merlotti, V. De Paola, F. Valleggi, L. Gennari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sex steroid hormones play an important role in the maintenance of bone mass in males and in females. Even though androgens are the major sex steroids in men, direct and indirect evidence emerged suggesting that estrogens may also play a major role in male skeletal health. Since the testes account for only 15% of circulating estrogens in males, the remaining 85% comes from peripheral aromatization of androgen precursors in different tissues, including bone. Human models of aromatase deficiency clearly demonstrated the critical importance of the conversion of androgens into estrogens in regulating male skeletal homeostasis. Aromatase- deficient men showed tall stature due to continued longitudinal growth, unfused epiphyses, high bone turnover, and osteopenia. Interventional studies in adult men using aromatase inhibition confirmed that estrogens are important in controlling bone remodeling. Importantly either inherited (i.e. due to common polymorphisms at the human aromatase CYP19 gene) or acquired (i.e. by diseases or different compounds) variation in aromatase ability to convert androgen precursors into estrogen may also be relevant for skeletal homeostasis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-23
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Endocrinological Investigation
Volume30
Issue number6 Suppl
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Aromatase
Estrogens
Androgens
Bone and Bones
Bone Remodeling
Homeostasis
Epiphyses
Aptitude
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Testis
Steroids
Maintenance
Health
Growth
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Nuti, R., Martini, G., Merlotti, D., De Paola, V., Valleggi, F., & Gennari, L. (2007). Bone metabolism in men: role of aromatase activity. Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, 30(6 Suppl), 18-23.

Bone metabolism in men : role of aromatase activity. / Nuti, R.; Martini, G.; Merlotti, D.; De Paola, V.; Valleggi, F.; Gennari, L.

In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, Vol. 30, No. 6 Suppl, 2007, p. 18-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nuti, R, Martini, G, Merlotti, D, De Paola, V, Valleggi, F & Gennari, L 2007, 'Bone metabolism in men: role of aromatase activity.', Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, vol. 30, no. 6 Suppl, pp. 18-23.
Nuti R, Martini G, Merlotti D, De Paola V, Valleggi F, Gennari L. Bone metabolism in men: role of aromatase activity. Journal of Endocrinological Investigation. 2007;30(6 Suppl):18-23.
Nuti, R. ; Martini, G. ; Merlotti, D. ; De Paola, V. ; Valleggi, F. ; Gennari, L. / Bone metabolism in men : role of aromatase activity. In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation. 2007 ; Vol. 30, No. 6 Suppl. pp. 18-23.
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