Both the precursors and the effectors of human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells may belong to T lymphocytes

Maria Cristina Mingari, Daniela Pende, Raffaella Cozzani, Annalisa Merli, Alessandro Poggi, Silvano Ferrini, Lorenzo Moretta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present experiments were designed to perform a further investigation of the cell lineage of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. In the presence of adherent cells both T and not-T cells, separated on the basis of rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes (E rosettes), generated LAK activity after short-term culture in recombinant interleukin-2 in 5 different individuals tested. Since at the termination of the culture more than 98% of cells were T11-positive, it is evident that both LAK precursor and effector cells may belong to the T cell lineage. By applying a culture technique which allows the clonal expansion of virtually all T cells, we further selected and analyzed T cell clones with LAK activity. Under the culture conditions used, LAK clones represented approximately 4% of all proliferating clones. All had cytolytic activity against K562 target cells as well and also released large amounts of γ-interferon following phytohemagglutinin stimulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-441
Number of pages5
JournalLa Ricerca in Clinica e in Laboratorio
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1986

Keywords

  • γ-interferon
  • Lymphokine-activated killer cells
  • Recombinant interleukin-2
  • T cell clones
  • T3 and T11 surface antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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