Botulinum toxin type A in the healing of a chronic buttock ulcer in a patient with spastic paraplegia after spinal cord injury

Domenico Intiso, Mario Basciani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Pressure sores are a significant secondary complication in spinal cord injured patients. A new indication for botulinum toxin type A is described here, in treatment of recurrent muscular spasms that had hampered the healing of a chronic buttock ulcer in a subject with severe spastic paraplegia. Case report: A 27-year-old man with spastic paraplegia following traumatic spinal cord lesion at the thoracic level had developed recurrent severe muscular spasms, particularly involving the buttock region, with an Ashworth scale score of 3-4 and a Spasm Frequency Scale of grade 4. The patient had a pressure ulcer in the left gluteal region (grade IV according to the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP). Several treatments were administered without success, and all efforts at healing the ulcer by topical medication were hampered by recurrent spasms involving the buttock muscles and ulcer region. The left gluteus maximus muscle was treated with 2 infiltrations of 660 IU botulinum toxin type A. The use of botulinum toxin type A allowed better care of the pressure ulcer, which had healed by 6 months after the initial infiltration. Conclusion: The use of botulinum toxin type A may be an important adjunctive therapy for treatment of pathological conditions involving recalcitrant involuntary muscle contraction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1100-1102
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume41
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2009

Keywords

  • Botulinum toxin
  • Spasm
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Ulcer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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