Bovine lactoferrin prevents invasive fungal infections in very low birth weight infants: A randomized controlled trial

Paolo Manzoni, Ilaria Stolfi, Hubert Messner, Silvia Cattani, Nicola Laforgia, Mario G. Romeo, Lina Bollani, Matteo Rinaldi, Elena Gallo, Michele Quercia, Milena Maule, Michael Mostert, Lidia Decembrino, Rosario Magaldi, Fabio Mosca, Federica Vagnarelli, Luigi Memo, Pasqua M. Betta, Mauro Stronati, Daniele Farina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lactoferrin is a mammalian milk glycoprotein involved in innate immunity. Recent data show that bovine lactoferrin (bLF) prevents late-onset sepsis in preterm very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of data from a multicenter randomized controlled trial where preterm VLBW neonates randomly received bLF (100 mg/day; group A1), bLF + Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (10 6 colony-forming units per day; group A2), or placebo (group B) for 6 weeks. Here we analyze the incidence rates of fungal colonization, invasive fungal infection (IFI), and rate of progression from colonization to infection in all groups. RESULTS: This study included 472 neonates whose clinical, nutritional, and demographical characteristics were similar. Overall, the incidence of fungal colonization was comparable (17.6%, 16.6%, and 18.5% in A1, A2, and B, respectively; P = .89 [A1] and .77 [A2]). In contrast, IFIs were significantly decreased in A1 and A2 (0.7% and 2.0%, respectively) compared with B (7.7%; P = .002 [A1] and .02 [A2]), and this was significantly true both in

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-123
Number of pages8
JournalPediatrics
Volume129
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

Keywords

  • Candida
  • Fungal sepsis
  • Lactoferrin
  • Prophylaxis
  • VLBW neonates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Bovine lactoferrin prevents invasive fungal infections in very low birth weight infants: A randomized controlled trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this