Brain activity in rectosigmoid pain: Unravelling conditioning pain modulatory pathways

Christina Brock, Søren Schou Olesen, Massimiliano Valeriani, Lars Arendt-Nielsen, Asbjørn Mohr Drewes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Conditioning Pain Modulation (CPM) represents the various descending inhibitory mechanisms induced by a heterotopic noxious stimulation (previously termed DNIC). CPM-induced modulations in brain activity have not previously been investigated to visceral pain. Hence the aims were to assess the role of CPM in terms of: (1) psychophysics, (2) alterations in topography and amplitudes of evoked brain potentials and (3) modelling the brain activity. Methods: Fifteen healthy volunteers were stimulated electrically in the rectosigmoid, and 64-channel brain activity was recorded two times before (reproducibility), during and after induction of CPM by immersing the non-dominant hand into water at 2°C for 180. s (cold pressor). Results: During CPM pain scores were reduced in comparison to baseline (P≤0.001), which corresponds to 30% pain attenuation. In comparison to baseline significant differences in bipolar EEG topography were seen during CPM, where N2 moved from central to frontal activity (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)829-837
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume123
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Pain
Brain
Psychophysics
Visceral Pain
Conditioning (Psychology)
Evoked Potentials
Electroencephalography
Healthy Volunteers
Hand
Water

Keywords

  • CPM
  • Descending pain control
  • DNIC
  • Evoked potentials
  • Neurophysiology
  • Psychophysical
  • Source modelling
  • Top-down pain matrix
  • Visceral pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Brain activity in rectosigmoid pain : Unravelling conditioning pain modulatory pathways. / Brock, Christina; Olesen, Søren Schou; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 123, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 829-837.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brock, Christina ; Olesen, Søren Schou ; Valeriani, Massimiliano ; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars ; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr. / Brain activity in rectosigmoid pain : Unravelling conditioning pain modulatory pathways. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2012 ; Vol. 123, No. 4. pp. 829-837.
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