Brain-computer communication: Unlocking the locked in

Andrea Kübler, Boris Kotchoubey, Jochen Kaiser, Niels Birbaumer, Jonathan R. Wolpaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With the increasing efficiency of life-support systems and better intensive care, more patients survive severe injuries of the brain and spinal cord. Many of these patients experience locked-in syndrome: The active mind is locked in a paralyzed body. Consequently, communication is extremely restricted or impossible. A muscle-independent communication channel overcomes this problem and is realized through a brain-computer interface, a direct connection between brain and computer. The number of technically elaborated brain-computer interfaces is in contrast with the number of systems used in the daily life of locked-in patients. It is hypothesized that a profound knowledge and consideration of psychological principles are necessary to make brain-computer interfaces feasible for locked-in patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)358-375
Number of pages18
JournalPsychological Bulletin
Volume127
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2001

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Brain-Computer Interfaces
Communication
Brain
Life Support Systems
Quadriplegia
Critical Care
Spinal Cord Injuries
Psychology
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Kübler, A., Kotchoubey, B., Kaiser, J., Birbaumer, N., & Wolpaw, J. R. (2001). Brain-computer communication: Unlocking the locked in. Psychological Bulletin, 127(3), 358-375. https://doi.org/10.1037//0033-2909.127.3.358

Brain-computer communication : Unlocking the locked in. / Kübler, Andrea; Kotchoubey, Boris; Kaiser, Jochen; Birbaumer, Niels; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

In: Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 127, No. 3, 05.2001, p. 358-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kübler, A, Kotchoubey, B, Kaiser, J, Birbaumer, N & Wolpaw, JR 2001, 'Brain-computer communication: Unlocking the locked in', Psychological Bulletin, vol. 127, no. 3, pp. 358-375. https://doi.org/10.1037//0033-2909.127.3.358
Kübler A, Kotchoubey B, Kaiser J, Birbaumer N, Wolpaw JR. Brain-computer communication: Unlocking the locked in. Psychological Bulletin. 2001 May;127(3):358-375. https://doi.org/10.1037//0033-2909.127.3.358
Kübler, Andrea ; Kotchoubey, Boris ; Kaiser, Jochen ; Birbaumer, Niels ; Wolpaw, Jonathan R. / Brain-computer communication : Unlocking the locked in. In: Psychological Bulletin. 2001 ; Vol. 127, No. 3. pp. 358-375.
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