Brain-computer interfaces for communication and rehabilitation

Ujwal Chaudhary, Niels Birbaumer, Ander Ramos-Murguialday

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) use brain activity to control external devices, thereby enabling severely disabled patients to interact with the environment. A variety of invasive and noninvasive techniques for controlling BCIs have been explored, most notably EEG, and more recently, near-infrared spectroscopy. Assistive BCIs are designed to enable paralyzed patients to communicate or control external robotic devices, such as prosthetics; rehabilitative BCIs are designed to facilitate recovery of neural function. In this Review, we provide an overview of the development of BCIs and the current technology available before discussing experimental and clinical studies of BCIs. We first consider the use of BCIs for communication in patients who are paralyzed, particularly those with locked-in syndrome or complete locked-in syndrome as a result of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We then discuss the use of BCIs for motor rehabilitation after severe stroke and spinal cord injury. We also describe the possible neurophysiological and learning mechanisms that underlie the clinical efficacy of BCIs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)513-525
Number of pages13
JournalNature Reviews Neurology
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Brain-computer interfaces for communication and rehabilitation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this