Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB in rat brain are significantly altered after haloperidol and risperidone administration

Francesco Angelucci, Aleksander A. Mathé, Luigi Aloe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The antipsychotics haloperidol and risperidone are widely used in the therapy of schizophrenia. The former drug mainly acts on the dopamine (DA) D2 receptor whereas risperidone binds to both DA and serotonin (5HT) receptors, particularly in the neurons of striatal and limbic structures. Recent evidence suggests that neurotrophins might also be involved in antipsychotic action in the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously reported that haloperidol and risperidone significantly affect brain nerve growth factor (NGF) level suggesting that these drugs influence the turnover of endogenous growth factors. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports survival and differentiation of developing and mature brain DA neurons. We hypothesized that treatments with haloperidol or risperidone will affect synthesis/release of brain BDNF and tested this hypothesis by measuring BDNF and TrkB in rat brain regions after a 29-day-treatment with haloperidol or risperidone added to chow. Drug treatments had no effects on weight of brain regions. Chronic administration of these drugs, however, altered BDNF synthesis or release and expression of TrkB-immunoreactivity within the brain. Both haloperidol and risperidone significantly decreased BDNF concentrations in frontal cortex, occipital cortex and hippocampus and decreased or increased TrkB receptors in selected brain structures. Because BDNF can act on a variety of CNS neurons, it is reasonable to hypothesize that alteration of brain level of this neurotrophin could constitute one of the mechanisms of action of antipsychotic drugs. These observations also support the possibility that neurotrophic factors play a role in altered brain function in schizophrenic disorders. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)783-794
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 15 2000

Fingerprint

Risperidone
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Haloperidol
Brain
Nerve Growth Factors
Antipsychotic Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Schizophrenia
Central Nervous System
trkB Receptor
Neurons
Corpus Striatum
Occipital Lobe
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Serotonin Receptors
Dopaminergic Neurons
Frontal Lobe
Nerve Growth Factor
Hippocampus

Keywords

  • Antipsychotic drugs
  • Dopamine
  • Nerve growth factor
  • Neurotrophins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB in rat brain are significantly altered after haloperidol and risperidone administration. / Angelucci, Francesco; Mathé, Aleksander A.; Aloe, Luigi.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, Vol. 60, No. 6, 15.06.2000, p. 783-794.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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