Brain mitochondrial impairment in early-onset Parkinson's disease with or without PINK1 mutation

Mario Rango, Gabriele Dossi, Letizia Squarcina, Cristiana Bonifati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: PINK1 mutations are likely to affect mitochondrial function. The objective of this study was to study brain mitochondrial function in patients with early-onset Parkinson's disease, with or without PINK1 mutations. Methods: We investigated brain intracellular pH, mitochondrial activity, and energetics with functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with early-onset Parkinson's disease with PINK1 mutations (n = 10), early-onset Parkinson's disease without PINK1 mutations (n = 10), and healthy sex- and age-matched subjects (n = 20). We measured peak areas of phosphocreatine and beta adenosine triphosphate. Results: The EOPD- group had normal PCr + βATP contents at rest (P = NS) and under activation (P = NS), but reduced contents during recovery (P < 0.001). The EOPD+ group had abnormal PCr + βATP contents at rest (P < 0.001) and during activation (P < 0.001); during recovery, the contents only partially recovered (P < 0.001). Brain intracellular pH alterations were more severe with EOPD+ than with EOPD−. Conclusions: Brain mitochondrial impairments were similar in early-onset Parkinson's disease without PINK1 mutations and late-onset Parkinson's disease. However, mitochondrial impairments were more severe in early-onset Parkinson's disease with PINK1 mutations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)504-507
Number of pages4
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2020

Keywords

  • brain mitochondrial functioning
  • brain pH
  • early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD)
  • phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)
  • PINK1 gene mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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