Brain MRI lesion volume measurement reproducibility is not dependent on the disease burden in patients with multiple sclerosis

Marco Rovaris, Giovanna Mastronardo, Maria Pia Sormani, Giuseppe Iannucci, Mariaemma Rodegher, Giancarlo Comi, Massimo Filippi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We evaluated the potential effect of the lesion burden on the reproducibility of repeated lesion volume (LV) measurements from brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Dual-echo, conventional spin echo brain MRI scans were obtained from 107 patients with MS. On proton density-weighted images, LV was assessed three times by the same raters, using a semi-automated, local thresholding technique for lesion segmentation. Mean LV (MLV) was 16.1 mL (range = 0.7- 57.3 mL). The mean intra-observer coefficient of variation (COV) for the three measurement replicates was 2.6% (range = 0.2-7.2%). The intra-observer measurement variance (Var) increased with MLV and the fitted model was Var = 0.00187 MLV1.84. This indicates that LV measurements can be considered as measures whose variances are proportional to the square of their mean values, i.e., these measures have constant COV. Using a semi-automated, local thresholding segmentation technique, the reproducibility of LV measurements from brain MRI scans of patients with MS is not significantly influenced by varying lesion burdens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1185-1189
Number of pages5
JournalMagnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume16
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1998

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Clinical trials
  • Lesion volume
  • Measurement reproducibility
  • Multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Structural Biology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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