Brain, technology and creativity. BrainArt: A BCI-based entertainment tool to enact creativity and create drawing from cerebral rhythms

Raffaella Folgieri, Claudio Lucchiari, Marco Granato, Daniele Grechi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The present article presents a high-level study on creativity. From a theoretical point of view, we conceptualized cognitive framework of creativity based on the notion of balance between conscious and unconscious processes. Indeed, creativity may be considered a borderline state of mind, in which the thought seems to fluctuate in a near-consciousness state. When the idea arises to the consciousness, the mind turns back to its previous equilibrium, and divergent thinking is replaced by canonical thinking. Starting with this framework, we designed and developed an entertainment application, in which creativity is enacted by unconscious processes, but in collaboration with conscious motivation. Our aim was then to activate a new, dedicated balance between conscious and unconscious processes, in order to obtain a state of mind similar to the spontaneous creative process, but directly guided by brain activity without the intervention of verbal and semantic modulations

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDigital Da Vinci: Computers in the Arts and Sciences
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages65-97
Number of pages33
ISBN (Print)9781493905362, 1493909649, 9781493905355
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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    Folgieri, R., Lucchiari, C., Granato, M., & Grechi, D. (2014). Brain, technology and creativity. BrainArt: A BCI-based entertainment tool to enact creativity and create drawing from cerebral rhythms. In Digital Da Vinci: Computers in the Arts and Sciences (pp. 65-97). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0965-0_4