Brain ultrasound rehearsal before surgery

A pilot cadaver study

Carlo Giussani, Matteo Riva, Valentin Djonov, Simone Beretta, Francesco Prada, Erik Sganzerla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been shown that brain ultrasonography (US) is an efficient tool for improving three-dimensional (3D) spatial orientation during neurosurgical interventions. However, it necessitates specific training as it is highly operator-dependent. To date, neurosurgeons have relied solely on intraoperative practice to improve their mastery of brain US; this has obvious limitations. Herein, we consider whether a study of brain US on human cadavers could enable a training platform for neurosurgeons and residents to be developed. Standard two-dimensional (2D) brain US was performed on two human cadavers (one fresh-frozen and one Thiel-prepared) through left frontoparietal, left frontal, right temporal, and left parietal craniotomies. US workflow and image quality were assessed in both preparations. It was possible to assess US in both cadaver preparations; however, the specimen prepared with Thiel-fixation performed better, with superior image quality and specimen usability at room temperature. US images were obtainable through all surgical corridors with the main intracranial anatomical landmarks easily identifiable. US of cadaveric brains is feasible and delivers good quality results. This technique could allow neurosurgeons to develop the expertise required for a successful clinical application preoperatively. Clin. Anat. 30:1017–1023, 2017.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1017-1023
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Anatomy
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2017

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Cadaver
Ultrasonography
Brain
Workflow
Craniotomy
Temperature
Neurosurgeons

Keywords

  • brain
  • cadaver
  • education
  • ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Histology

Cite this

Giussani, C., Riva, M., Djonov, V., Beretta, S., Prada, F., & Sganzerla, E. (2017). Brain ultrasound rehearsal before surgery: A pilot cadaver study. Clinical Anatomy, 30(8), 1017-1023. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22919

Brain ultrasound rehearsal before surgery : A pilot cadaver study. / Giussani, Carlo; Riva, Matteo; Djonov, Valentin; Beretta, Simone; Prada, Francesco; Sganzerla, Erik.

In: Clinical Anatomy, Vol. 30, No. 8, 01.11.2017, p. 1017-1023.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giussani, C, Riva, M, Djonov, V, Beretta, S, Prada, F & Sganzerla, E 2017, 'Brain ultrasound rehearsal before surgery: A pilot cadaver study', Clinical Anatomy, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 1017-1023. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22919
Giussani C, Riva M, Djonov V, Beretta S, Prada F, Sganzerla E. Brain ultrasound rehearsal before surgery: A pilot cadaver study. Clinical Anatomy. 2017 Nov 1;30(8):1017-1023. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22919
Giussani, Carlo ; Riva, Matteo ; Djonov, Valentin ; Beretta, Simone ; Prada, Francesco ; Sganzerla, Erik. / Brain ultrasound rehearsal before surgery : A pilot cadaver study. In: Clinical Anatomy. 2017 ; Vol. 30, No. 8. pp. 1017-1023.
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