Breastfeeding-Associated Hypernatremia: A Systematic Review of the Literature

Camilla Lavagno, Pietro Camozzi, Samuele Renzi, Sebastiano A G Lava, Giacomo D. Simonetti, Mario G. Bianchetti, Gregorio P. Milani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are increasing reports on hypernatremia, a potentially devastating condition, in exclusively breastfed newborn infants. Our purposes were to describe the clinical features of the condition and identify the risk factors for it. We performed a review of the existing literature in the National Library of Medicine database and in the search engine Google Scholar. A total of 115 reports were included in the final analysis. Breastfeeding-associated neonatal hypernatremia was recognized in infants who were ‰ 21 days of age and had > 10% weight loss of birth weight. Cesarean delivery, primiparity, breast anomalies or breastfeeding problems, excessive prepregnancy maternal weight, delayed first breastfeeding, lack of previous breastfeeding experience, and low maternal education level were significantly associated with breastfeeding-associated hypernatremia. In addition to excessive weight loss (> 10%), the following clinical findings were observed: poor feeding, poor hydration state, jaundice, excessive body temperature, irritability or lethargy, decreased urine output, and epileptic seizures. In conclusion, the present survey of the literature identifies the following risk factors for breastfeeding-associated neonatal hypernatremia: cesarean delivery, primiparity, breastfeeding problems, excessive maternal body weight, delayed breastfeeding, lack of previous breastfeeding experience, and low maternal education level. ;copy International Lactation Consultant Association.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-74
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Hypernatremia
Breast Feeding
Mothers
Parity
Weight Loss
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
Education
Search Engine
Lethargy
Consultants
Jaundice
Body Temperature
Lactation
Birth Weight
Epilepsy
Breast
Body Weight
Urine
Newborn Infant
Databases

Keywords

  • breastfeeding
  • dehydration
  • hypernatremia
  • newborn infant
  • review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Lavagno, C., Camozzi, P., Renzi, S., Lava, S. A. G., Simonetti, G. D., Bianchetti, M. G., & Milani, G. P. (2016). Breastfeeding-Associated Hypernatremia: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Journal of Human Lactation, 32(1), 67-74. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890334415613079

Breastfeeding-Associated Hypernatremia : A Systematic Review of the Literature. / Lavagno, Camilla; Camozzi, Pietro; Renzi, Samuele; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Simonetti, Giacomo D.; Bianchetti, Mario G.; Milani, Gregorio P.

In: Journal of Human Lactation, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 67-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lavagno, C, Camozzi, P, Renzi, S, Lava, SAG, Simonetti, GD, Bianchetti, MG & Milani, GP 2016, 'Breastfeeding-Associated Hypernatremia: A Systematic Review of the Literature', Journal of Human Lactation, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 67-74. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890334415613079
Lavagno C, Camozzi P, Renzi S, Lava SAG, Simonetti GD, Bianchetti MG et al. Breastfeeding-Associated Hypernatremia: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Journal of Human Lactation. 2016 Feb 1;32(1):67-74. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890334415613079
Lavagno, Camilla ; Camozzi, Pietro ; Renzi, Samuele ; Lava, Sebastiano A G ; Simonetti, Giacomo D. ; Bianchetti, Mario G. ; Milani, Gregorio P. / Breastfeeding-Associated Hypernatremia : A Systematic Review of the Literature. In: Journal of Human Lactation. 2016 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 67-74.
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