Bronchial fibroepithelial polyp: A clinico-radiologic, bronchoscopic, histopathological and in-situ hybridisation study of 15 cases of a poorly recognised lesion

Eleonora Casalini, Alberto Cavazza, Alessandro Andreani, Alessandro Marchioni, Gloria Montanari, Francesca Gaia Cappiello, Maria Cecilia Mengoli, Paolo Corradini, Lorenzo Agostini, Roberto Serini, Giulio Rossi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Aims: Bronchial fibroepithelial polyp is an uncommon, poorly recognised lesion, lacking clear diagnostic criteria at histology, but possibly mimicking neoplastic growth on clinico-radiologic and histopathological grounds. The aim of this study was to define the clinico-pathological features, bronchoscopic appearance and treatment of bronchial fibroepithelial polyp. Methods: We collected the largest series of bronchial fibroepithelial polyps (15 consecutive cases), including clinico-pathological, bronchoscopic, radiologic and histological features. Results: Overall, there were 13 males and 2 females, with a mean age of 68 years at diagnosis. Eight patients were asymptomatic, whereas four presented with haemoptysis, two with fever, cough and pneumonia-like opacity, and one with dry recurrent cough. Mean size of the lesion was 6.5mm (range, 2-20mm) without any prevalence for segmental bronchi. Lesions larger than 10mm were always symptomatic and visible at computed tomography scans. At bronchoscopy, the lesion appeared as a firm endobronchial nodule with hard consistency and glistening, whitish, smooth surface. A multilobulated and sepimentated surface was observed in the largest polyps. Whatever the size, histological features were quite similar in all cases, consisting in a polypoid lesion with a dense, collagenous, hypocellular stroma with some thin-walled, ectatic vessels and a regular respiratory mucosa on surface. In-situ hybridisation with human papillomavirus probe was negative in all the eight tested cases. Conclusion: Despite the benign behaviour of bronchial fibroepithelial polyps, it is important to fix some robust diagnostic criteria in order to avoid misdiagnoses leading to unnecessary aggressive treatment. Differential diagnosis mainly includes inflammatory polyps, hamartomas and papillomas.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Respiratory Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2015

Keywords

  • Benign
  • Bronchus
  • Fibroepithelial
  • Lung
  • Polyp
  • Tumour

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Genetics(clinical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Bronchial fibroepithelial polyp: A clinico-radiologic, bronchoscopic, histopathological and in-situ hybridisation study of 15 cases of a poorly recognised lesion'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this