Burden of unidentifiable mycobacteria in a reference laboratory

E. Tortoli, A. Bartoloni, E. C. Böttger, S. Emler, C. Garzelli, E. Magliano, A. Mantella, N. Rastogi, L. Rindi, C. Scarparo, P. Urbano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Modern identification techniques at the genomic level have greatly improved the taxonomic knowledge of mycobacteria. In adjunct to nucleic acid sequences, mycobacterial identification has been endorsed by investigation of the lipidic patterns of unique mycolic acids in such organisms. In the present investigation, the routine use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of mycolic acids, followed by the sequencing of the 16S rRNA, allowed us to select 72 mycobacterial strains, out of 1,035 screened, that do not belong to any of the officially recognized mycobacterial species. Most strains (i.e., 47) were isolated from humans, 13 were from the environment, 3 were from animals, and 9 were from unknown sources. The majority of human isolates were grown from the respiratory tract and were therefore most likely not clinically significant. Some, however, were isolated from sterile sites (blood, pleural biopsy, central venous catheter, or pus). Many isolates, including several clusters of two or more strains, mostly slow growers and scotochromogenic, presented unique genetic and lipidic features. We hope the data reported here, including the results of major conventional identification tests, the HPLC profiles of strains isolated several times, and the whole sequences of the 16S rRNA hypervariable regions of all 72 mycobacteria, may encourage reporting of new cases. The taxonomy of the genus Mycobacterium is, in our opinion, still far from being fully elucidated, and the reporting of unusual strains provides the best background for the recognition of new species. Our report also shows the usefulness of the integration of novel technology to routine diagnosis, especially in cases involving slow-growing microorganisms such as mycobacteria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4058-4065
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume39
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Mycobacterium
Mycolic Acids
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Suppuration
Central Venous Catheters
Respiratory System
Nucleic Acids
Technology
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Tortoli, E., Bartoloni, A., Böttger, E. C., Emler, S., Garzelli, C., Magliano, E., ... Urbano, P. (2001). Burden of unidentifiable mycobacteria in a reference laboratory. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 39(11), 4058-4065. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.39.11.4058-4065.2001

Burden of unidentifiable mycobacteria in a reference laboratory. / Tortoli, E.; Bartoloni, A.; Böttger, E. C.; Emler, S.; Garzelli, C.; Magliano, E.; Mantella, A.; Rastogi, N.; Rindi, L.; Scarparo, C.; Urbano, P.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 39, No. 11, 2001, p. 4058-4065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tortoli, E, Bartoloni, A, Böttger, EC, Emler, S, Garzelli, C, Magliano, E, Mantella, A, Rastogi, N, Rindi, L, Scarparo, C & Urbano, P 2001, 'Burden of unidentifiable mycobacteria in a reference laboratory', Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 39, no. 11, pp. 4058-4065. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.39.11.4058-4065.2001
Tortoli E, Bartoloni A, Böttger EC, Emler S, Garzelli C, Magliano E et al. Burden of unidentifiable mycobacteria in a reference laboratory. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2001;39(11):4058-4065. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.39.11.4058-4065.2001
Tortoli, E. ; Bartoloni, A. ; Böttger, E. C. ; Emler, S. ; Garzelli, C. ; Magliano, E. ; Mantella, A. ; Rastogi, N. ; Rindi, L. ; Scarparo, C. ; Urbano, P. / Burden of unidentifiable mycobacteria in a reference laboratory. In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2001 ; Vol. 39, No. 11. pp. 4058-4065.
@article{9a00a71a8bc94a0b9faee9c893ca94de,
title = "Burden of unidentifiable mycobacteria in a reference laboratory",
abstract = "Modern identification techniques at the genomic level have greatly improved the taxonomic knowledge of mycobacteria. In adjunct to nucleic acid sequences, mycobacterial identification has been endorsed by investigation of the lipidic patterns of unique mycolic acids in such organisms. In the present investigation, the routine use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of mycolic acids, followed by the sequencing of the 16S rRNA, allowed us to select 72 mycobacterial strains, out of 1,035 screened, that do not belong to any of the officially recognized mycobacterial species. Most strains (i.e., 47) were isolated from humans, 13 were from the environment, 3 were from animals, and 9 were from unknown sources. The majority of human isolates were grown from the respiratory tract and were therefore most likely not clinically significant. Some, however, were isolated from sterile sites (blood, pleural biopsy, central venous catheter, or pus). Many isolates, including several clusters of two or more strains, mostly slow growers and scotochromogenic, presented unique genetic and lipidic features. We hope the data reported here, including the results of major conventional identification tests, the HPLC profiles of strains isolated several times, and the whole sequences of the 16S rRNA hypervariable regions of all 72 mycobacteria, may encourage reporting of new cases. The taxonomy of the genus Mycobacterium is, in our opinion, still far from being fully elucidated, and the reporting of unusual strains provides the best background for the recognition of new species. Our report also shows the usefulness of the integration of novel technology to routine diagnosis, especially in cases involving slow-growing microorganisms such as mycobacteria.",
author = "E. Tortoli and A. Bartoloni and B{\"o}ttger, {E. C.} and S. Emler and C. Garzelli and E. Magliano and A. Mantella and N. Rastogi and L. Rindi and C. Scarparo and P. Urbano",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1128/JCM.39.11.4058-4065.2001",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "4058--4065",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Microbiology",
issn = "0095-1137",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Burden of unidentifiable mycobacteria in a reference laboratory

AU - Tortoli, E.

AU - Bartoloni, A.

AU - Böttger, E. C.

AU - Emler, S.

AU - Garzelli, C.

AU - Magliano, E.

AU - Mantella, A.

AU - Rastogi, N.

AU - Rindi, L.

AU - Scarparo, C.

AU - Urbano, P.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Modern identification techniques at the genomic level have greatly improved the taxonomic knowledge of mycobacteria. In adjunct to nucleic acid sequences, mycobacterial identification has been endorsed by investigation of the lipidic patterns of unique mycolic acids in such organisms. In the present investigation, the routine use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of mycolic acids, followed by the sequencing of the 16S rRNA, allowed us to select 72 mycobacterial strains, out of 1,035 screened, that do not belong to any of the officially recognized mycobacterial species. Most strains (i.e., 47) were isolated from humans, 13 were from the environment, 3 were from animals, and 9 were from unknown sources. The majority of human isolates were grown from the respiratory tract and were therefore most likely not clinically significant. Some, however, were isolated from sterile sites (blood, pleural biopsy, central venous catheter, or pus). Many isolates, including several clusters of two or more strains, mostly slow growers and scotochromogenic, presented unique genetic and lipidic features. We hope the data reported here, including the results of major conventional identification tests, the HPLC profiles of strains isolated several times, and the whole sequences of the 16S rRNA hypervariable regions of all 72 mycobacteria, may encourage reporting of new cases. The taxonomy of the genus Mycobacterium is, in our opinion, still far from being fully elucidated, and the reporting of unusual strains provides the best background for the recognition of new species. Our report also shows the usefulness of the integration of novel technology to routine diagnosis, especially in cases involving slow-growing microorganisms such as mycobacteria.

AB - Modern identification techniques at the genomic level have greatly improved the taxonomic knowledge of mycobacteria. In adjunct to nucleic acid sequences, mycobacterial identification has been endorsed by investigation of the lipidic patterns of unique mycolic acids in such organisms. In the present investigation, the routine use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of mycolic acids, followed by the sequencing of the 16S rRNA, allowed us to select 72 mycobacterial strains, out of 1,035 screened, that do not belong to any of the officially recognized mycobacterial species. Most strains (i.e., 47) were isolated from humans, 13 were from the environment, 3 were from animals, and 9 were from unknown sources. The majority of human isolates were grown from the respiratory tract and were therefore most likely not clinically significant. Some, however, were isolated from sterile sites (blood, pleural biopsy, central venous catheter, or pus). Many isolates, including several clusters of two or more strains, mostly slow growers and scotochromogenic, presented unique genetic and lipidic features. We hope the data reported here, including the results of major conventional identification tests, the HPLC profiles of strains isolated several times, and the whole sequences of the 16S rRNA hypervariable regions of all 72 mycobacteria, may encourage reporting of new cases. The taxonomy of the genus Mycobacterium is, in our opinion, still far from being fully elucidated, and the reporting of unusual strains provides the best background for the recognition of new species. Our report also shows the usefulness of the integration of novel technology to routine diagnosis, especially in cases involving slow-growing microorganisms such as mycobacteria.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034755949&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034755949&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/JCM.39.11.4058-4065.2001

DO - 10.1128/JCM.39.11.4058-4065.2001

M3 - Article

C2 - 11682530

AN - SCOPUS:0034755949

VL - 39

SP - 4058

EP - 4065

JO - Journal of Clinical Microbiology

JF - Journal of Clinical Microbiology

SN - 0095-1137

IS - 11

ER -