Business bias

How epidemiologic studies may underestimate or fail to detect increased risks of cancer and other diseases

Valerio Gennaro, Lorenzo Tomatis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In spite of claiming primary prevention as their aim, studies of potential occupational and environmental health hazards that are funded either directly or indirectly by industry are likely to have negative results. The authors present three common scenarios in which faulty design of epidemiologic studies skews results, and list 15 study design flaws that lead to results that are dangerously misleading with regard to both the evaluation and the improvement of public health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-359
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume11
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Environmental Health
Occupational Health
Primary Prevention
Epidemiologic Studies
Industry
Public Health
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Industry influence
  • Public health
  • Study design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Business bias : How epidemiologic studies may underestimate or fail to detect increased risks of cancer and other diseases. / Gennaro, Valerio; Tomatis, Lorenzo.

In: International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, Vol. 11, No. 4, 10.2005, p. 356-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6667c2d504e1437fab02042d98ad026c,
title = "Business bias: How epidemiologic studies may underestimate or fail to detect increased risks of cancer and other diseases",
abstract = "In spite of claiming primary prevention as their aim, studies of potential occupational and environmental health hazards that are funded either directly or indirectly by industry are likely to have negative results. The authors present three common scenarios in which faulty design of epidemiologic studies skews results, and list 15 study design flaws that lead to results that are dangerously misleading with regard to both the evaluation and the improvement of public health.",
keywords = "Epidemiology, Industry influence, Public health, Study design",
author = "Valerio Gennaro and Lorenzo Tomatis",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "356--359",
journal = "International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health",
issn = "1077-3525",
publisher = "Maney Publishing",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Business bias

T2 - How epidemiologic studies may underestimate or fail to detect increased risks of cancer and other diseases

AU - Gennaro, Valerio

AU - Tomatis, Lorenzo

PY - 2005/10

Y1 - 2005/10

N2 - In spite of claiming primary prevention as their aim, studies of potential occupational and environmental health hazards that are funded either directly or indirectly by industry are likely to have negative results. The authors present three common scenarios in which faulty design of epidemiologic studies skews results, and list 15 study design flaws that lead to results that are dangerously misleading with regard to both the evaluation and the improvement of public health.

AB - In spite of claiming primary prevention as their aim, studies of potential occupational and environmental health hazards that are funded either directly or indirectly by industry are likely to have negative results. The authors present three common scenarios in which faulty design of epidemiologic studies skews results, and list 15 study design flaws that lead to results that are dangerously misleading with regard to both the evaluation and the improvement of public health.

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Industry influence

KW - Public health

KW - Study design

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27644543751&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=27644543751&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 356

EP - 359

JO - International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health

JF - International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health

SN - 1077-3525

IS - 4

ER -