Cadherins and the tumour progression: Is it all in a switch?

Ugo Cavallaro, Birgit Schaffhauser, Gerhard Christofori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

163 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Progression to tumour malignancy involves changes in a tumour cell's capabilities to adhere and communicate with neighboring cells and with its extracellular environment. Correlation studies in human cancer specimen and functional experiments with cultured tumour cells and transgenic mouse models have indicated that the loss of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin is causally involved in the formation of epithelial cancers (carcinomas). More recently, it has been observed that the function of E-cadherin is replaced or overruled by the expression of mesenchymal cadherins, such as N-cadherin. Although the functional implication of such a 'cadherin switch' remains to be elucidated, recent experimental results demonstrating an interaction of cadherins with tyrosine kinase receptors suggest that changes in cadherin expression may not only modulate tumour cell adhesion but also affect signal transduction and, hence, the malignant phenotype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-128
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Letters
Volume176
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 25 2002

Fingerprint

Cadherins
Neoplasms
Cultured Tumor Cells
Cell Adhesion Molecules
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Cell Adhesion
Transgenic Mice
Signal Transduction
Carcinoma
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Cadherin switch
  • Cadherins
  • Cancer
  • Cell adhesion
  • Metastasis
  • Tumourigenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Molecular Biology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Cadherins and the tumour progression : Is it all in a switch? / Cavallaro, Ugo; Schaffhauser, Birgit; Christofori, Gerhard.

In: Cancer Letters, Vol. 176, No. 2, 25.02.2002, p. 123-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cavallaro, Ugo ; Schaffhauser, Birgit ; Christofori, Gerhard. / Cadherins and the tumour progression : Is it all in a switch?. In: Cancer Letters. 2002 ; Vol. 176, No. 2. pp. 123-128.
@article{770d3426234546bbbbcb84b9e3f6bf2a,
title = "Cadherins and the tumour progression: Is it all in a switch?",
abstract = "Progression to tumour malignancy involves changes in a tumour cell's capabilities to adhere and communicate with neighboring cells and with its extracellular environment. Correlation studies in human cancer specimen and functional experiments with cultured tumour cells and transgenic mouse models have indicated that the loss of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin is causally involved in the formation of epithelial cancers (carcinomas). More recently, it has been observed that the function of E-cadherin is replaced or overruled by the expression of mesenchymal cadherins, such as N-cadherin. Although the functional implication of such a 'cadherin switch' remains to be elucidated, recent experimental results demonstrating an interaction of cadherins with tyrosine kinase receptors suggest that changes in cadherin expression may not only modulate tumour cell adhesion but also affect signal transduction and, hence, the malignant phenotype.",
keywords = "Cadherin switch, Cadherins, Cancer, Cell adhesion, Metastasis, Tumourigenesis",
author = "Ugo Cavallaro and Birgit Schaffhauser and Gerhard Christofori",
year = "2002",
month = "2",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1016/S0304-3835(01)00759-5",
language = "English",
volume = "176",
pages = "123--128",
journal = "Cancer Letters",
issn = "0304-3835",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cadherins and the tumour progression

T2 - Is it all in a switch?

AU - Cavallaro, Ugo

AU - Schaffhauser, Birgit

AU - Christofori, Gerhard

PY - 2002/2/25

Y1 - 2002/2/25

N2 - Progression to tumour malignancy involves changes in a tumour cell's capabilities to adhere and communicate with neighboring cells and with its extracellular environment. Correlation studies in human cancer specimen and functional experiments with cultured tumour cells and transgenic mouse models have indicated that the loss of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin is causally involved in the formation of epithelial cancers (carcinomas). More recently, it has been observed that the function of E-cadherin is replaced or overruled by the expression of mesenchymal cadherins, such as N-cadherin. Although the functional implication of such a 'cadherin switch' remains to be elucidated, recent experimental results demonstrating an interaction of cadherins with tyrosine kinase receptors suggest that changes in cadherin expression may not only modulate tumour cell adhesion but also affect signal transduction and, hence, the malignant phenotype.

AB - Progression to tumour malignancy involves changes in a tumour cell's capabilities to adhere and communicate with neighboring cells and with its extracellular environment. Correlation studies in human cancer specimen and functional experiments with cultured tumour cells and transgenic mouse models have indicated that the loss of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin is causally involved in the formation of epithelial cancers (carcinomas). More recently, it has been observed that the function of E-cadherin is replaced or overruled by the expression of mesenchymal cadherins, such as N-cadherin. Although the functional implication of such a 'cadherin switch' remains to be elucidated, recent experimental results demonstrating an interaction of cadherins with tyrosine kinase receptors suggest that changes in cadherin expression may not only modulate tumour cell adhesion but also affect signal transduction and, hence, the malignant phenotype.

KW - Cadherin switch

KW - Cadherins

KW - Cancer

KW - Cell adhesion

KW - Metastasis

KW - Tumourigenesis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037169868&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037169868&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0304-3835(01)00759-5

DO - 10.1016/S0304-3835(01)00759-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 11804738

AN - SCOPUS:0037169868

VL - 176

SP - 123

EP - 128

JO - Cancer Letters

JF - Cancer Letters

SN - 0304-3835

IS - 2

ER -