Calcium and phosphorus nutrition in preterm infants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolic bone disease is a common event in preterm infants. Between 24 wk gestation and term, the fetus accrues approximately 80% of body Ca, P and Mg. Consequently, preterm infants miss in part or completely the period of greatest mineral accretion. Ca and P requirements in preterm infants are based on demands for matching intrauterine bone mineral accretion rates and on maintenance of normal serum Ca and P concentrations. Daily physical therapy may be a useful adjunct, as it is associated with a significant increase in bone mineral density and content. Osteopenia/rickets of prematurity seems to be a self-resolving disease. However, this does not imply that a period of demineralization is acceptable. While the potential long-term consequences on peak bone mass are unclear at the moment, the short-term benefits include the avoidance of fractures, less marked dolicocephaly and improved linear growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Supplement
Volume94
Issue number449
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Premature Infants
Phosphorus
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Calcium
Bone Density
Minerals
Bone and Bones
Rickets
Fetus
Maintenance
Pregnancy
Growth
Serum
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Nutrition
  • Phosphorus
  • Preterm infants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Calcium and phosphorus nutrition in preterm infants. / Demarini, Sergio.

In: Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Supplement, Vol. 94, No. 449, 10.2005, p. 87-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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