Calcium Deposition and Associated Chronic Diseases (Atherosclerosis, Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis, and Others)

Fabiola Atzeni, Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini, Maorizio Bevilacqua

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Extracellular matrix mineralization or calcification occurs in many pathologic conditions, including atherosclerosis, medial wall calcification, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and chondrocalcinosis. Vascular wall calcification is the most common and involves two mechanisms: passive calcification resulting from breakdown of the protection system and active calcification resulting from transdifferentiation of mesenchymal cells in the vascular wall to bone. Although reports are conflicting, several matrix proteins are identified as protective factors against dystrophic calcification in nonosseous tissues. Serum matrix Gla protein may be a marker of osteometabolic syndromes that cause hyperostosis and plays a role in Milwaukee shoulder syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-426
Number of pages14
JournalRheumatic Disease Clinics of North America
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

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