Cancer survivorship research in Europe and the United States: Where have we been, where are we going, and what can we learn from each other?

Julia H. Rowland, Erin E. Kent, Laura P. Forsythe, Jon Håvard Loge, Lars Hjorth, Adam Glaser, Vittorio Mattioli, Sophie D. Fosså

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The growing number of cancer survivors worldwide has led to of the emergence of diverse survivorship movements in the United States and Europe. Understanding the evolution of cancer survivorship within the context of different political and health care systems is important for identifying the future steps that need to be taken and collaborations needed to promote research among and enhance the care of those living after cancer. The authors first review the history of survivorship internationally and important related events in both the United States and Europe. Lessons learned from survivorship research are then broadly discussed, followed by examination of the infrastructure needed to sustain and advance this work, including platforms for research, assessment tools, and vehicles for the dissemination of findings. Future perspectives concern the identification of collaborative opportunities for investigators in Europe and the United States to accelerate the pace of survivorship science going forward.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2094-2108
Number of pages15
JournalCancer
Volume119
Issue numberSUPPL11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2013

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Keywords

  • cancer
  • Europe
  • research
  • survivorship
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Rowland, J. H., Kent, E. E., Forsythe, L. P., Loge, J. H., Hjorth, L., Glaser, A., ... Fosså, S. D. (2013). Cancer survivorship research in Europe and the United States: Where have we been, where are we going, and what can we learn from each other? Cancer, 119(SUPPL11), 2094-2108. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28060

Cancer survivorship research in Europe and the United States : Where have we been, where are we going, and what can we learn from each other? / Rowland, Julia H.; Kent, Erin E.; Forsythe, Laura P.; Loge, Jon Håvard; Hjorth, Lars; Glaser, Adam; Mattioli, Vittorio; Fosså, Sophie D.

In: Cancer, Vol. 119, No. SUPPL11, 01.06.2013, p. 2094-2108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rowland, JH, Kent, EE, Forsythe, LP, Loge, JH, Hjorth, L, Glaser, A, Mattioli, V & Fosså, SD 2013, 'Cancer survivorship research in Europe and the United States: Where have we been, where are we going, and what can we learn from each other?', Cancer, vol. 119, no. SUPPL11, pp. 2094-2108. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28060
Rowland, Julia H. ; Kent, Erin E. ; Forsythe, Laura P. ; Loge, Jon Håvard ; Hjorth, Lars ; Glaser, Adam ; Mattioli, Vittorio ; Fosså, Sophie D. / Cancer survivorship research in Europe and the United States : Where have we been, where are we going, and what can we learn from each other?. In: Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 119, No. SUPPL11. pp. 2094-2108.
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