Cartilage tissue engineering with novel nonwoven structured biomaterial based on hyaluronic acid benzyl ester

J. Aigner, J. Tegeler, P. Hutzler, D. Campoccia, A. Pavesio, C. Hammer, E. Kastenbauer, A. Naumann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using the benzyl ester of hyaluronic acid (HYAFF® 11), a recently developed semisynthetic resorbable material, as a scaffold for the culture of human nasoseptal chondrocytes in tissue-engineering procedures of cartilage reconstruction. Different techniques such as immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the behavior, morphology, and phenotype expression of the chondrocytes, which were initially expanded and then seeded on the material. The nonwoven cell carrier allowed good viability and adhesivity of the cells without any surface treatment with additional substances. Furthermore, the cultured cells expressed cartilage-specific collagen type II, indicating that they were able to redifferentiate within the scaffold of HYAFF® 11 and were able to retain a chondrocyte phenotype even after a long period of in vitro conditions. Nevertheless, the expression of collagen type I, which was produced by dedifferentiated or incompletely redifferentiated chondrocytes, was noticeable. Additional data were obtained by subcutaneous implantation of samples seeded with human cells in the in vivo model of the athymic nude mouse. The results after 1 month revealed the development of tissue similar to hyaline cartilage. This study is promising for the use of this scaffold for tissue engineering of cartilage replacements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-181
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1998

Fingerprint

Hyaluronic acid
Cartilage
Biocompatible Materials
Tissue Engineering
Chondrocytes
Tissue engineering
Biomaterials
Esters
Collagen
Nude Mice
Scaffolds
Cells
Hyaline Cartilage
Phenotype
Collagen Type II
Scaffolds (biology)
Collagen Type I
Confocal Microscopy
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Surface treatment

Keywords

  • Bioresorbable materials
  • Cartilage
  • Confocal laser scanning microscopy
  • Hyaluronic acid
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials

Cite this

Cartilage tissue engineering with novel nonwoven structured biomaterial based on hyaluronic acid benzyl ester. / Aigner, J.; Tegeler, J.; Hutzler, P.; Campoccia, D.; Pavesio, A.; Hammer, C.; Kastenbauer, E.; Naumann, A.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Vol. 42, No. 2, 11.1998, p. 172-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aigner, J. ; Tegeler, J. ; Hutzler, P. ; Campoccia, D. ; Pavesio, A. ; Hammer, C. ; Kastenbauer, E. ; Naumann, A. / Cartilage tissue engineering with novel nonwoven structured biomaterial based on hyaluronic acid benzyl ester. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. 1998 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 172-181.
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