Category-specific semantic deficits do not reflect the sensory/functional organization of the brain: A test of the "sensory quality" hypothesis

Marcella Laiacona, Erminio Capitani, Alfonso Caramazza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We report the performance of a herpes simplex encephalitis patient, EA, who shows a dissociation between poor performance for living things and spared performance for sensory quality categories, when appropriate measures are taken to control for baseline differences among categories in task difficulty and when we eliminate the contribution of visual processing deficits in the recognition of objects. This pattern of performance is problematic for theories of category-specific deficits that are based on the assumption that these deficits reflect selective damage to modality-specific semantic subsystems but is consistent with domain-specific accounts and theories based on the assumption that the structure of conceptual knowledge reflects the correlational structure among object properties.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-231
Number of pages11
JournalNeurocase
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Keywords

  • Category-specific deficits
  • Herpes simplex encephalitis
  • Semantics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

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