CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte inheritance. Evidence for major autosomal recessive genes

Maurizio Clementi, Paola Forabosco, Alberto Amadori, Rita Zamarchi, Giustina De Silvestro, Elena Di Gianantonio, Luigi Chieco-Bianchi, Romano Tenconi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The CD4/CD8 ratio has long been used for the follow-up and monitor of many infectious diseases. Following the demonstration in 1983 that the CD4/CD8 ratio in the mouse is under genetic control, it was subsequently shown to be controlled by a major locus in man. To define the mode of inheritance of the CD4/CD8 ratio, we addressed the absolute number of CD4 and CD8 cells in a large unselected control sample and in members of 70 nuclear families. Pedigrees of nuclear families were analyzed by complex segregation analysis. Data was adjusted prior to this analysis to remove the effects of relevant covariates. The non-genetic-transmission and the multifactorial model could be easily rejected for both CD4 and CD8 cells. Among the different inheritance models, involving both a major gene and a multifactorial (MFT) component, a major autosomal recessive gene with a residual MFT effect controlling the high number of CD4 and a major autosomal recessive gene with a residual MFT effect controlling the high number of CD8 cells were the significantly best-fitting ones. Our findings have some practical implications. Among all, the knowledge of the CD4+ cell number and the proportion between CD4+ and CD8+ T cells could be a useful parameter in predicting human immunodeficiency virus infection outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-342
Number of pages6
JournalHuman Genetics
Volume105
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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Recessive Genes
CD4-CD8 Ratio
Nuclear Family
T-Lymphocytes
Cell Count
Virus Diseases
Pedigree
Communicable Diseases
HIV
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Clementi, M., Forabosco, P., Amadori, A., Zamarchi, R., De Silvestro, G., Di Gianantonio, E., ... Tenconi, R. (1999). CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte inheritance. Evidence for major autosomal recessive genes. Human Genetics, 105(4), 337-342. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004390051111

CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte inheritance. Evidence for major autosomal recessive genes. / Clementi, Maurizio; Forabosco, Paola; Amadori, Alberto; Zamarchi, Rita; De Silvestro, Giustina; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Tenconi, Romano.

In: Human Genetics, Vol. 105, No. 4, 1999, p. 337-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clementi, M, Forabosco, P, Amadori, A, Zamarchi, R, De Silvestro, G, Di Gianantonio, E, Chieco-Bianchi, L & Tenconi, R 1999, 'CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte inheritance. Evidence for major autosomal recessive genes', Human Genetics, vol. 105, no. 4, pp. 337-342. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004390051111
Clementi, Maurizio ; Forabosco, Paola ; Amadori, Alberto ; Zamarchi, Rita ; De Silvestro, Giustina ; Di Gianantonio, Elena ; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi ; Tenconi, Romano. / CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte inheritance. Evidence for major autosomal recessive genes. In: Human Genetics. 1999 ; Vol. 105, No. 4. pp. 337-342.
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