CD8+ cells in HIV infection produce macrophage inflammatory protein-1α and RANTES: A comparative study in long term survivors and progressor patients

Stefania Zanussi, Monica D'Andrea, Cecilia Simonelli, Viviana Battiston, Umberto Tirelli, Paolo De Paoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Evidence suggests that CD8+ lymphocytes are involved in the control of Human Immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection by the release of HIV-suppressive factors. The human chemokines RANTES and the macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) have been identified to be potent inhibitors of HIV in vitro. The aim of this study was to determine whether high levels of these chemokines are associated with a delayed progression of HIV disease. We have therefore analysed the in vitro production of RANTES and MIP-1α from purified stimulated CD8+ cells from HIV+ long term survivors (LTS) and, as a comparison, from HIV+ patients with progressive disease. RANTES production was similar in LTS and progressors (14.06 ± 3, 13.36 ± 4.1 ng/ml, not statistically significant); the same cells from healthy controls show a RANTES production of 20 ± 3.5 ng/ml (P = 0.034 versus LTS and P = 0.038 versus progressors). MIP-1α production was slightly reduced in LTS (96.8 ± 12 ng/ml) and progressors (91.6 ± 17, not statistically significant between the two groups) when compared to healthy controls (109 ± 7 ng/ml, P = 0.03). Our study suggests that resistance to HIV-1 progression in LTS may not be associated with high levels of RANTES and MIP-1α production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-108
Number of pages4
JournalImmunology Letters
Volume53
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1996

Keywords

  • CD8 cells
  • chemokines
  • HIV-1
  • long term survivors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

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