Celiac disease: In vitro and in vivo safety and palatability of wheat-free sorghum food products

Carolina Ciacci, Luigi Maiuri, Nicola Caporaso, Cristina Bucci, Luigi Del Giudice, Domenica Rita Massardo, Paola Pontieri, Natale Di Fonzo, Scott R. Bean, Brian Ioerger, Marco Londei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background & aims: Celiac disease is a condition in which genetically predisposed people have an autoimmune reaction to gluten proteins found in all wheat types and closely related cereals such as barley and rye. This reaction causes the formation of autoantibodies and the destruction of the villi in the small intestine, which results in malabsorption of nutrientsand other gluten-induced autoimmune diseases. Sorghum is a cereal grain with potential to be developed into an important crop for human food products. The flour produced from white sorghum hybrids is light in color and has a bland, neutral taste that does not impart unusual colors or flavors to food products. These attributes make it desirable for use in wheat-free food products. While sorghum is considered as a safe food for celiac patients, primarily due to its relationship to maize, no direct testing has been conducted on its safety for gluten intolerance. Therefore studies are needed to assess its safety and tolerability in celiac patients. Thus the aim of the present study was to assess safety and tolerability of sorghum flour products in adult celiac disease patients, utilizing an in vitro and in vivo challenge. Results: Sorghum protein digests did not elicit any morphometric or immunomediated alteration of duodenal explants from celiac patients. Patients fed daily for 5 days with sorghum-derived food product did not experience gastrointestinal or non-gastrointestinal symptoms and the level of anti-transglutaminase antibodies was unmodified at the end of the 5-days challenge. Conclusions: Sorghum-derived products did not show toxicity for celiac patients in both in vitro and in vivo challenge. Therefore sorghum can be considered safe for people with celiac disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)799-805
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Nutrition
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Sorghum
Celiac Disease
Triticum
Safety
Food
Abdomen
Glutens
Flour
Color
Transglutaminases
In Vitro Techniques
Hordeum
Autoantibodies
Autoimmune Diseases
Small Intestine
Zea mays
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Light

Keywords

  • Celiac disease
  • Gluten-free diet
  • in vitro challenge
  • Nutrition
  • Palatability
  • Sorghum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Gastroenterology
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Ciacci, C., Maiuri, L., Caporaso, N., Bucci, C., Del Giudice, L., Rita Massardo, D., ... Londei, M. (2007). Celiac disease: In vitro and in vivo safety and palatability of wheat-free sorghum food products. Clinical Nutrition, 26(6), 799-805. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2007.05.006

Celiac disease : In vitro and in vivo safety and palatability of wheat-free sorghum food products. / Ciacci, Carolina; Maiuri, Luigi; Caporaso, Nicola; Bucci, Cristina; Del Giudice, Luigi; Rita Massardo, Domenica; Pontieri, Paola; Di Fonzo, Natale; Bean, Scott R.; Ioerger, Brian; Londei, Marco.

In: Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 26, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 799-805.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ciacci, C, Maiuri, L, Caporaso, N, Bucci, C, Del Giudice, L, Rita Massardo, D, Pontieri, P, Di Fonzo, N, Bean, SR, Ioerger, B & Londei, M 2007, 'Celiac disease: In vitro and in vivo safety and palatability of wheat-free sorghum food products', Clinical Nutrition, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 799-805. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2007.05.006
Ciacci C, Maiuri L, Caporaso N, Bucci C, Del Giudice L, Rita Massardo D et al. Celiac disease: In vitro and in vivo safety and palatability of wheat-free sorghum food products. Clinical Nutrition. 2007 Dec;26(6):799-805. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2007.05.006
Ciacci, Carolina ; Maiuri, Luigi ; Caporaso, Nicola ; Bucci, Cristina ; Del Giudice, Luigi ; Rita Massardo, Domenica ; Pontieri, Paola ; Di Fonzo, Natale ; Bean, Scott R. ; Ioerger, Brian ; Londei, Marco. / Celiac disease : In vitro and in vivo safety and palatability of wheat-free sorghum food products. In: Clinical Nutrition. 2007 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 799-805.
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