Cell kinetics analysis in patients affected by squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated with primary surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

Renzo Corvò, Giovanni Margarino, Giuseppe Sanguineti, Elio Geido, Marco Scala, Paola Mereu, Monica Cavallari, Salvatore Bonanno, Giacomo Garaventa, Marco Barbieri, Walter Giaretti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The increasing complexity of management strategies for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HN-SCC) calls for the investigation of new objective prognostic parameters to subdivide patients according to the tumor's biological aggressiveness. Methods: We evaluated in 35 HN-SCC patients the pretreatment cell kinetics parameters and DNA ploidy after in vivo infusion of bromodeoxyuridine and flow cytometric analysis. Patients were treated with radical surgery followed by conventional radiation therapy. Locoregional control data are available for follow-up times above five years. Results: We found that the likelihood of locoregional control for patients with rapidly proliferating HN-SCC characterized by a short potential doubling time (Tpot 5 days). Moreover, when patients were stratified according to DNA ploidy and Tpot value, we found that the locoregional failure rate for rapidly proliferating tumors was significantly higher for diploid HN-SCCs than for aneuploid HN-SCCs. Conclusion: The present data suggest that patients with resectable HN-SCC characterized by fast growth might have a worse prognosis after surgery and adjuvant conventional radiotherapy and might benefit from more aggressive radiotherapeutic modalities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-58
Number of pages6
JournalTumori
Volume86
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2000

Keywords

  • Cell kinetics
  • Head and neck cancer
  • Radiotherapy
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

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