Cellular magnetic resonance with iron oxide nanoparticles: Long-term persistence of SPIO signal in the CNS after transplanted cell death

Chiara Cianciaruso, Antonella Pagani, Cristina Martelli, Marco Bacigaluppi, Mario Leonardo Squadrito, Alessia Lo Dico, Michele De Palma, Roberto Furlan, Giovanni Lucignani, Andrea Falini, Alessandra Biffi, Luisa Ottobrini, Letterio Salvatore Politi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Results: No variations in SPIO signal voids were detected along longitudinal monitoring in brain hemispheres transplanted with DT-sensitive cells. Ex vivo analyses showed persistence of iron nanoparticle deposits at transplantation sites.

Conclusion: Due to the long-term persistence of signal after transplanted cell death, caution is advised when SPIOs are employed for cell tracking. Original submitted 27 January 2014; Revised submitted 18 April 201.

Aim: To study the specificity of cellular MRI based on superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs), especially within the CNS.

Materials and Methods: A microglial cell line was engineered for the expression of a suicide gene, the receptor of diphtheria toxin (DT), and two reporter genes, green fluorescent protein and luciferase, in order to induce, in a controlled manner, cell death and test it through bioluminescence. SPIO-labeled DT-sensitive and control DT-insensitive cells were transplanted into the brains of mice, which underwent serial MRI and bioluminescence studies before and up to 90 days after DT-induced cell death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1457-1474
Number of pages18
JournalNanomedicine
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2014

Keywords

  • cell death
  • cellular MRI
  • diphtheria toxin
  • microglial cell
  • specificity
  • superparamagnetic iron oxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Development

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