Cerebral white matter in the centrum semiovale exhibits a larger N-acetyl signal than does gray matter in long echo time 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

G. Tedeschi, A. Righini, A. Bizzi, A. S. Barnett, J. R. Alger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Long echo time (272 ms) 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging was used to measure the relative magnitudes of the N-acetylaspartate (NAA) signal in a variety of anatomically defined brain structures (centrum semiovale, thalamus, medial frontal cortex, and genu of the corpus callosum) composed primarily of gray matter or white matter. Six normal young adult humans aged 30-40 were studied. With a 95% level of statistical confidence, the white matter in the centrum semiovale (CSO) produced a more intense NAA signal than did the gray matter in the thalamus and the frontal cortex. Differences between the white matter regions were also noted. The CSO white matter's NAA signal yielded a larger NAA signal than did the white matter of the genu of the corpus callosum. Possible reasons for the anatomical variation in the cerebral NAA signal intensity are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

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