Cervical cord magnetization transfer ratio and clinical changes over 18 months in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: A preliminary study

A. Charil, D. Caputo, R. Cavarretta, M. P. Sormani, P. Ferrante, Massimo Filippi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) permits the quantitative estimation of cervical cord tissue damage in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: To determine whether a single time-point MTR scan of the cervical cord is associated with short-term disease evolution in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) MS. Methods: Using a 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a tailored cervical cord phased array coil, fast short-tau inversion recovery (fast-STIR) and MTR scans were obtained from 14 untreated patients with RRMS at baseline. Cervical cord MTR histograms were derived. Over the 18-month follow-up period, relapse rate was measured and disability assessed by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score. Results: Average cervical cord MTR was correlated with relapse rate (r= -0.56, P = 0.037). A moderate correlation (r values ranging from -0.33 to -0.36) between baseline cervical cord MTR metrics and EDSS changes over 18 months was also noted, albeit statistical significance was not reached (P = 0.26 and 0.21, respectively) perhaps because of the relatively small sample size. Conclusions: This study suggests that a 'snapshot' MT MRI assessment of the cervical cord may detect cervical cord tissue changes associated with short-term disease evolution in RRMS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)662-665
Number of pages4
JournalMultiple Sclerosis Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Cervical cord
  • Clinical evolution
  • Expanded Disability Status Scale
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Magnetization transfer ratio
  • Multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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