Change of seizure frequency in pregnant epileptic women

D. Schmidt, R. Canger, G. Avanzini, D. Battino, C. Cusi, G. Beck-Mannagetta, S. Koch, D. Rating, D. Janz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effect of pregnancy on seizure frequency was monitored prospectively in 136 pregnancies of 122 epileptic women. Pregnancy did not influence the seizure frequency in 68 pregnancies (50%). In 50 pregnancies (37%) the number of seizures increased during pregnancy or puerperium. The seizure frequency decreased in 18 pregnancies (13%). In 34 out of 50 pregnancies (68%) the increase was associated with non-compliance with the drug regimen or sleep deprivation. In seven out of 18 pregnancies (39%) improvement was related to correction of non-compliance or sleep deprivation during the pregestational nine months. Insufficiently low plasma concentrations of antiepileptic drugs were found in 47% of the women with uncontrolled epilepsy during pregnancy. The course of epilepsy during pregnancy is primarily influenced by non-compliance, sleep deprivation during pregnancy, and inadequate therapy before and during pregnancy. With good medical attention pregnancy itself seems to have only a minimal influence on the course of epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)751-755
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume46
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1983

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Pregnant Women
Seizures
Pregnancy
Sleep Deprivation
Epilepsy
Anticonvulsants
Postpartum Period

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Schmidt, D., Canger, R., Avanzini, G., Battino, D., Cusi, C., Beck-Mannagetta, G., ... Janz, D. (1983). Change of seizure frequency in pregnant epileptic women. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 46(8), 751-755. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.46.8.751

Change of seizure frequency in pregnant epileptic women. / Schmidt, D.; Canger, R.; Avanzini, G.; Battino, D.; Cusi, C.; Beck-Mannagetta, G.; Koch, S.; Rating, D.; Janz, D.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 46, No. 8, 1983, p. 751-755.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmidt, D, Canger, R, Avanzini, G, Battino, D, Cusi, C, Beck-Mannagetta, G, Koch, S, Rating, D & Janz, D 1983, 'Change of seizure frequency in pregnant epileptic women', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, vol. 46, no. 8, pp. 751-755. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.46.8.751
Schmidt, D. ; Canger, R. ; Avanzini, G. ; Battino, D. ; Cusi, C. ; Beck-Mannagetta, G. ; Koch, S. ; Rating, D. ; Janz, D. / Change of seizure frequency in pregnant epileptic women. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 1983 ; Vol. 46, No. 8. pp. 751-755.
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