ALTERATIONS DE LA FONCTION VENTRICULAIRE GAUCHE INDUITES PAR L'EFFORT ISOMETRIQUE CHEZ LE CORONARIEN

Translated title of the contribution: Changes in left ventricular function during isometric exercise in coronary heart disease

S. De Servi, G. Specchia, D. Ardissino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effects of isometric exercise on left ventricular function in 16 patients with chronic coronary heart disease were assessed by measuring left ventricular pressures and volumes under basal conditions and during a sustained effort of 2 minutes 30 seconds at 50% of the maximal effort. In 4 patients (Group I) with abnormal elevation of left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) (over 4 mmHg) the end diastolic volume remained unchanged and the diastolic pressure-volume curve was displaced upwards. The ejection fraction fell together with the percentage filling during the first part of diastole with 50% filling occurring after 61% instead of 45% of diastole. The time constant T also increased showing abnormal relaxation. In 9 patients without abnormal elevation of LVEDP on exercise no changes in the other parameters studied were observed. Our results show that pathological elevation of LVEDP during isometric exercise is associated with a decreased ejection fraction and an abnormality of left ventricular relaxation with a reduced rate of filling during protodiastole and an upward displacement of the diastolic pressure-volume curve. The LVEDP alone is therefore an important index of the haemodynamic behaviour of the left ventricle during isometric exercise.

Translated title of the contributionChanges in left ventricular function during isometric exercise in coronary heart disease
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)418-424
Number of pages7
JournalArchives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux
Volume73
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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