Changes in the Provision of Family Care to Frail Older People in Familistic Welfare States: Lessons From Israel and Italy

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Abstract

Objective: Our article aims to investigate changes in the rate of informal care provision, which occurred in Israel and Italy in the last decade. In addition, we analyze typology and magnitude of the main factors contributing to explain the probability of providing informal care. Method: We used data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) at two selected time points (2006/2007 and 2015). Results: The probability of offering social support to elder family members who live outside the household has been trending down substantially over the years. The likelihood of providing unpaid care is significantly higher when one performs volunteer or charitable work and/or engages in leisure activities, and the importance of these two variables has been growing over the years. Discussion: Israel and Italy have experienced over the years a remarkable decline in the share of older adults providing informal care. The article helps to identify which factors have been associated with this phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Sep 21 2019

Keywords

  • informal caregiver
  • intensive care
  • long-term care
  • SHARE
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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