Changing patterns in the postinfarction use of calcium antagonists

G. Zuanetti, R. Latini, A. P. Maggioni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Our study investigated the evolving patterns of prescription of calcium channel blocking agents for patients with acute myocardial infarction who were studied in a series of three large successive trials conducted during the last decade. We also assessed current determinants of the use of calcium antagonists for postinfarction patients. In the three trials, a progressive and highly significant decrease in the prescription of these drugs for patients at hospital discharge was evident (from 47.2% to 35.1% to 19.0%); this decrease was more marked for nifedipine and verapamil than for diltiazem. Postinfarction angina, reinfarction, and a history of hypertension were associated with a greater use of calcium antagonists. The increasing use of beta blocking agents at discharge was a major independent negative determinant for prescribing calcium channel blocking agents. These agents are now given to postinfarction patients almost exclusively when a specific indication such as hypertension or angina is present.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-31
Number of pages7
JournalCardiology Review
Volume14
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Calcium Channels
Calcium
Hypertension
Prescription Drugs
Diltiazem
Proxy
Nifedipine
Verapamil
Prescriptions
Myocardial Infarction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Changing patterns in the postinfarction use of calcium antagonists. / Zuanetti, G.; Latini, R.; Maggioni, A. P.

In: Cardiology Review, Vol. 14, No. 3, 1997, p. 25-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zuanetti, G, Latini, R & Maggioni, AP 1997, 'Changing patterns in the postinfarction use of calcium antagonists', Cardiology Review, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 25-31.
Zuanetti, G. ; Latini, R. ; Maggioni, A. P. / Changing patterns in the postinfarction use of calcium antagonists. In: Cardiology Review. 1997 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 25-31.
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