Changing perspective on oncometabolites: From metabolic signature of cancer to tumorigenic and immunosuppressive agents

Mauro Corrado, Luca Scorrano, Silvia Campello

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During tumorigenesis, the shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis in ATP production accounts for the dramatic change in the cellular metabolism and represents one of the major steps leading to tumour formation. The so-called Warburg effect is currently considered something more than a mere modification in the cellular metabolism. The paradox that during cancer cell proliferation the increase in energy need is supplied by glycolysis can be only explained by taking into account the many roles that intermediates of glycolysis or TCA cycle play in cellular physiology, besides energy production. Recent studies have shown that metabolic intermediates induce changes in chromatin structure or drive neo-angiogenesis. In this review, we present some of the latest findings in the study of cancer metabolism with particular attention to how tumour metabolism and its microenvironment can favour tumour growth and aggressiveness, by hijacking and dampening the anti-tumoral immune response.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46692-46706
Number of pages15
JournalOncotarget
Volume7
Issue number29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Immunosuppressive Agents
Glycolysis
Neoplasms
Oxidative Phosphorylation
Chromatin
Carcinogenesis
Adenosine Triphosphate
Cell Proliferation
Growth

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Immune response
  • Lymphocytes
  • Metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Changing perspective on oncometabolites : From metabolic signature of cancer to tumorigenic and immunosuppressive agents. / Corrado, Mauro; Scorrano, Luca; Campello, Silvia.

In: Oncotarget, Vol. 7, No. 29, 2016, p. 46692-46706.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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