Characterizing non-tuberculous mycobacteria infection in bronchiectasis

Paola Faverio, Anna Stainer, Giulia Bonaiti, Stefano C. Zucchetti, Edoardo Simonetta, Giuseppe Lapadula, Almerico Marruchella, Andrea Gori, Francesco Blasi, Luigi Codecasa, Alberto Pesci, James D. Chalmers, Michael R. Loebinger, Stefano Aliberti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic airway infection is a key aspect of the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis. A growing interest has been raised on non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. We aimed at describing the clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, therapeutic options and outcomes of bronchiectasis patients with pulmonary NTM (pNTM) disease. This was a prospective, observational study enrolling 261 adult bronchiectasis patients during the stable state at the San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy, from 2012 to 2015. Three groups were identified: pNTM disease; chronic P. aeruginosa infection; chronic infection due to bacteria other than P. aeruginosa. NTM were isolated in 32 (12%) patients, and among them, a diagnosis of pNTM disease was reached in 23 cases. When compared to chronic P. aeruginosa infection, patients with pNTM were more likely to have cylindrical bronchiectasis and a “tree-in-bud” pattern, a history of weight loss, a lower disease severity and a lower number of pulmonary exacerbations. Among pNTM patients who started treatment, 68% showed a radiological improvement, and 37% achieved culture conversion without recurrence, while 21% showed NTM isolation recurrence. NTM isolation seems to be a frequent event in bronchiectasis patients, and few parameters might help to suspect NTM infection. Treatment indications and monitoring still remain an important area for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1913
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 16 2016

Keywords

  • Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis
  • Non-tuberculous mycobacteria
  • Pulmonary infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Spectroscopy
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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