Checklist for the evaluation of low vision in uncooperative patients

R. Salati, O. Schiavulli, G. Giammari, R. Borgatti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To present a checklist for the evaluation of low vision in uncooperative patients; in this specific case, children with neurological deficits. Method: The checklist includes several behavioral indicators obtainable with a standard clinical examination. Each test is assigned a score (0 failure, 1=success). The final visual quotient score is obtained by dividing the partial score by the total number of tests performed. Eleven children with cerebral visual impairment were studied using behavioral and preferential looking techniques. Results: Visual quotient was >0 in all patients, indicating that residual visual function was always detectable. Average visual quotient was 0.74. Conclusion: Visual quotient can be useful both for follow-up examinations and comparison and integration with other evaluation methods (behavioral and instrumental) of residual visual capacity. In particular, if combined with preferential looking techniques, visual quotient testing permits characterization of the entire spectrum of low vision.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-94
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Volume38
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Low Vision
Checklist
Vision Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Checklist for the evaluation of low vision in uncooperative patients. / Salati, R.; Schiavulli, O.; Giammari, G.; Borgatti, R.

In: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Vol. 38, No. 2, 2001, p. 90-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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